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Updated: 14 min 18 sec ago

British Knockout Chess Championship

9 hours 21 min ago

• Gawain Jones becomes the first player in the British KO Quarter-Finals to pull ahead with a smooth victory in Game 1 over IM Alan Merry.

• England No. 1 Mickey Adams is held to a draw by Simon Williams in a sharp Queen’s Gambit.

• David Howell barely escapes defeat at the hands of IM Ravi Haria after disastrously weakening his kingside defences and being forced to give up the exchange.

• Live coverage on the London Chess Classic website continues today in Game 2 of each of the Quarter-Final classical play matches, followed by rapid playoffs and an Armageddon game if necessary.

After a first round in which GMs John Nunn and Matthew Turner were knocked out, more surprises were in store for the top seeds in the British Knockout on Sunday as Mickey Adams was held to a draw by Simon Williams, while David Howell was lucky to survive a lost position against Ravi Haria.

Simon Williams (aka the ‘Ginger GM’) lived up to his reputation as a fearless aggressive player, trying a bold thrust 8. g4 in a Queen’s Gambit Declined. Despite Adams striking back immediately in the centre, Williams was able to steer play into a slightly favourable endgame in which Adams was forced to defend accurately a pawn down to hold the draw.

David Howell looked to be cruising to victory two pawns up in a theoretical Catalan, but then blundered, opening up his king in a position where opposite-coloured bishops were a factor. He was forced to give up the exchange, and then ran his king to the queenside in a desperate bid to save the game. After a queen exchange, both sides promoted pawns, and with time running short, Haria checked Howell’s king all the way up the board but was unable to find a way to finish the game. Howell managed to escape into a drawn endgame, thanks to his active king.

Gawain Jones became the first player to go ahead in the Quarter-Finals, outplaying Alan Merry in a Modern Benoni and forcing the win of queen for rook and knight, while Jonathan Hawkins held a solid draw against Luke McShane in a Scotch Four Knights.

Quarter Finals, Classical Game 2 (Sunday Dec. 9):

1 Mickey Adams (0.5) v Simon Williams (0.5)
2 Ravi Haria (0.5) v David Howell (0.5)
3 Alan Merry (0) v Gawain Jones (1)
4 Luke McShane (0.5) v Jonathan Hawkins (0.5)

Quarter-Final Schedule:

Game 1: 11:00 – 15:00; Game 2: 16:00 – 20:00; Playoffs: 2030 – 2200.
Time limits: Classical games: 90 mins plus 30 secs per move increment throughout.

Playoffs (2 games): 10 mins plus 5 secs per move increment throughout. If still undecided, Armageddon game 5 mins v 4 mins, with 2 secs increment per move from move 61.

—————————————

The London Chess Classic is the UK’s largest chess tournament and the concluding leg of the Grand Chess Tour, an international circuit of world-class chess events inspired by legendary World Champion Garry Kasparov. It is the flagship event of Chess in Schools and Communities and includes a range of amateur and age-grade competitions for 1,000s of children from the charity initiative nationwide.

By Tim Wall

Categories: Ενημέρωση

North American Open 2018

9 hours 32 min ago

The 28th Annual North American Open will be held from 26-30 December, 2018, at Bally’s Casino Resort, 3645 Las Vegas Blvd S, Las Vegas, Nevada.

The event has 7 sections: Open, Under 2300, Under 2100, Under 1900, Under 1700, Under 1500 and Under 1250.

The Open Section is a 5-day tournament (December 26-30) with FIDE norms possible. The Under 2300 to Under 1250 Sections have either a 4-day schedule (December 26-29) or 3-day schedule (December 27-29) to participate in.

GM and IM norms are possible in the Open Section which will be played over 9 rounds of Swiss system with the time control 40/2, SD/30, d10. The other sections will be completed over 7 rounds of Swiss system.

Top rated players are Grandmasters Jinshi Bai 2568, Julio J Becerra 2520, Adrien Demuth 2517, Andrey Gorovets 2509, Zbigniew Pakleza 2506, Artur Jakubiec 2497 etc

Bally’s Casino Resort

The event has a $120,000 prize fund unconditionally guaranteed.

Open Section: $10000-5000-2500-1200-1000-800-600-500-400-400, clear winner or 1st on tiebreak bonus $200, top FIDE Under 2400/Unr $2400-1200. FIDE rated, GM & IM norms possible.
Under 2300 Section: $7000-4000-2000-1200-800-600-500-500-400-400.
Under 2100 Section: $7000-4000-2000-1200-800-600-500-500-400-400, no unrated may win over $2000.
Under 1900 Section: $7000-4000-2000-1200-800-600-500-500-400-400, no unrated may win over $1600.
Under 1700 Section: $6000-3000-1500-1000-800-600-500-500-400-400, no unrated may win over $1300.
Under 1500 Section: $5000-2500-1300-1000-700-600-500-400-300-300, no unrated may win over $1000.
Under 1250 Section: $3000-1500-1000-800-600-500-400-400-300-300, top Under 1000 (no unr) $1000-500, no unrated may win over $500. No separate U1000 section; players under 1000 in U1250 play for both U1250 and U1000 prizes; receive larger if winning both.

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Pro-Biz Cup: Caruana & Kasparov head star-studded line-up

9 hours 58 min ago

Hosted by DeepMind in Google’s UK headquarters in King’s Cross

As part of the 10th London Chess Classic, the Pro-Biz Cup brings leading business minds and the world’s leading Grandmasters together in a fun tournament to raise money for the UK charity Chess in Schools and Communities (CSC). This takes place on Mon 10 December.

This prestigious event will feature World Championship Challenger Fabiano Caruana, back in action in London just days after his gripping match with Magnus Carlsen.

Alongside will be his fellow competitors in the London Chess Classic (the final leg of the Grand Chess Tour 2018) Hikaru Nakamura, Maxime Vachier-Lagrave and Levon Aronian. Pairs of leading Grandmasters and amateurs will play alternate moves in an innovative rapidplay format, with the winning team being awarded the Pro-Biz Cup 2018.

Prominent among the teams of top-class Grandmasters and businesspeople are two of the world’s brightest minds:

- Demis Hassabis, the Co-Founder of Google’s leading Artificial Intelligence (AI) company DeepMind and creator of Alpha Zero and Alpha Go, which have pioneered breakthroughs in Chess and Go; and
- Garry Kasparov, the legendary World Chess Champion, who has become an enthusiastic advocate of AI since his epic Man vs Machine chess match with the Deep Thought supercomputer in 1997.

The impressive array of talent also includes England Olympiad team members Mickey Adams, David Howell, Gawain Jones and David Howell, as well as nine-year-old Shreyas Royal, England’s top Under 12 and the world’s second-highest rated player for his age.

The Teams:

Pair 1

- Fabiano Caruana, World Championship Challenger
- Chris Flowers, Chairman and CEO of J.C. Flowers & Co. LLC, an investment firm specialising in financial services

Pair 2

- Matthew Sadler, two-time British Champion
- Demis Hassabis, CEO and Co-Founder of DeepMind

Pair 3

- Garry Kasparov, former World Champion
- Terry Chapman, entrepreneur and former Chairman and CEO of Terence Chapman Group PLC

Pair 4

- David Howell, England No. 2
- Rajko Vujatovic, model risk consultant and three-time gold medallist in the World Diving Chess Championships

Pair 5

- Levon Aronian, Grand Chess Tour semi-finalist 2018.
- Justin Baptie, Managing Director of Insight Strategic Associates, a firm of accountants dealing with the SME and HNW market.

Pair 6

- Mickey Adams, England No. 1 and reigning British Champion.
- Natasha Regan, a Director at RPC Consulting and Women’s International Master.

Pair 7

- Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, Grand Chess Tour semi-finalist 2018.
- Gilles Betthaeuser, President of global real estate company Colliers International for France, Belgium, Spain, Morocco and Switzerland.

Pair 8

- Gawain Jones, two-time British Champion.
- Nigel Povah, an advisor to US firm PSI and an International Master.

Pair 9

- Hikaru Nakamura, Grand Chess Tour semi-finalist 2018.
- Karina Vazirova, Head of Product and Implementations at ClauseMatch, a London-based RegTech firm, and a Women’s International Master

Pair 10

- Ali Mortazavi, former CEO of Silence Therapeutics and an International Master.
- Shreyas Royal, 9, currently the top English Under 12 and ranked second in the world for his age.

The Pro-Biz Cup is part of the London Chess Classic and supports Chess in Schools and Communities

Categories: Ενημέρωση

London Chess Classic 2018

Fri, 12/07/2018 - 12:20

Fans eager for more fabulous top-class chess after the World Championship in London need look no further than the London Chess Classic, where the valiant challenger, Fabiano Caruana, will be back in town for a showdown with three of the world’s most exciting players from December 11-17, thanks to support from our new sponsor, The Lohia Foundation.

With an exciting Semi-finals and Final format, complete with Classical, Rapid & Blitz, plus a nail-biting Armageddon decider, the London Chess Classic will pit Fabi against fellow American Hikaru Nakamura, Armenia’s Levon Aronian and France’s Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (MVL) in the finale of the 2018 Grand Chess Tour.

The fantastic four will be dueling for a total of $300,000 (£230,000) in GCT prize money.

Just how Fabi will come back after his narrow loss (tied 6-6 in Classical, 3-0 in the Rapid playoffs) in the World Championship match against Magnus Carlsen will be the question on everyone’s lips – as his opponents are likely to face more of the superb opening preparation that Fabi displayed there.

In his Semi-Final matchup, Fabi faces Rapid & Blitz specialist Hikaru, while in the other Semi-Final, Levon plays MVL.

PLAYER STATS (World rankings, November 2018):
- Fabiano Caruana (Classical #2, 2832; Rapid #10, 2789; Blitz #16, 2767)
- Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (Classical #6, 2778; Rapid #11, 2786; Blitz #2, 2937)
- Levon Aronian (Classical #11, 2765; Rapid #7, 2802; Blitz #3, 2889)
- Hikaru Nakamura (Classical #17, 2746; Rapid #2, 2844; Blitz #4, 2858)

After two Classical games on December 11-12, play switches to Rapid & Blitz on Dec. 13. The winners then go through to the 3-day Final, held at the traditional Olympia London venue on December 15-16 (Classical) & 17 (Rapid & Blitz). There will also be a Third Place Playoff.

The 2018 GCT champion will take home a 1st prize of $120,000 (there’s $80,000 for 2nd, $60,000 for 3rd and $40,000 for 4th).

To watch the action live, you can book your tickets now (daily £25, season £60) for entrance to the London Chess Classic Final (December 15-17) at London Olympia.

These tickets will also give you access to the accompanying London Chess Festival events (total prizes over £24,000) at Olympia, including the FIDE-rated Open, 5-Day Classic events & Weekend Classic events, GM simultaneous displays, chess teacher training courses, & live commentary by leading Grandmasters.

For more info contact: info@londonchessclassic.com
Visit the website: www.londonchessclassic.com
Follow on Twitter: @london_chess

Categories: Ενημέρωση

European Amateur Chess Championship 2019

Fri, 12/07/2018 - 11:23

The European Amateur Chess Championship 2019 will be held in the island of Rhodes, Greece, from 5th-15th April, simultaneously with European Senior Chess Championship 2019.The events will be held in the Conference center of Olympic Palace Hotel, as the official hotel of the Championship.

The Championships are open tournaments for players registered or approved by their federation. ECU member federations shall have the right to send as many players as they wish.   All players must not hold any title above CM (or WCM for women) in the sections Under-1700 and Under-2000. All players must not hold any title above FM (or WFM for women) in the section Under-2300.

A player must not have a published FIDE rating of 2300 or greater for at least one year prior to the registration deadline of the event. For the Under-2000 section, a player must not have a published FIDE rating of 2000 or greater for at least one year prior to the start of the Championship. For the Under-1700 section, a player must not have a published FIDE rating of 1700 or greater for at least one year prior to the start of the championship. In case a player exceeds the rating of 1700 or 2000 after the registration deadline, he/she will play the upper rating category.

The registration for the event shall be done online by filling the entry form and sending it fulfilled to the organizers. Entries must be sent by the registration deadline 20 February 2019 by email to: chess.at.holidays@gmail.com

There will be separate championships for categories Under-2300, Under-2000 and Under-1700. In each rating section, a separate championship for women shall be organized only if there are at least 10 women entries otherwise the women’s event will be merged with men (open).T he championship is organized in a 9-round Swiss system, in accordance with FIDE Laws of Chess and the ECU Tournament Rules. The rate of play will be 90 minutes for 40 moves plus 30minutes for the rest of the game, with an increment of 30 seconds per move, starting from move one.

The total prize fund of the event is 4.000 EUR and the winners of each category receive the relevant title: European Amateur Chess Champion under 1700 under 2000 and 2300.

The Official Regulations of European Amateur Chess Championship 2019 can be downloaded below.

European_Amateur_Championship_2019

Registration_form_EACC_2019

Contact information:

Nikos Kalesis – FIDE International Organiser
Tel. (+30) 6938326161
* Christina Ioannidou – Tournament Secretariat
Email: chess.at.holidays@gmail.com

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Carlsen – Caruana 2018 – tiebreaks LIVE!

Wed, 11/28/2018 - 16:34

Replay: Caruana – Carlsen game 1 / Carlsen – Caruana game 2 / Caruana – Carlsen game 3 / Carlsen – Caruana game 4 / Caruana – Carlsen game 5 / Carlsen – Caruana game 6 / Carlsen – Caruana game 7 / Caruana – Carlsen game 8 / Caruana – Carlsen game 9 / Caruana – Carlsen game 10 / Carlsen – Caruana game 11 / Caruana – Carlsen game 12

Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the 2018 World Chess Championship match between the reigning champion Magnus Carlsen (Norway) and the challenger Fabiano Caruana (USA). In this live blog + live games from WCC 2018 we will be covering the event Carlsen – Caruana with the latest news, developments, interviews, and in-game details.

The most important feature here will be the lines of analysis by Lc0 – the open Neural Network, and the TCEC champion Stockfish running on a Super Computer of 128 cores.

 

Refresh the page to get the latest updates

Update 19:00 CET

Magnus Carlsen is the 2018 World Chess Champion! Congratulations! With a solid third game, Carlsen brings the match and the title home.

Update 18:00 CET

It all went downhill for Caruana. 2-0 for Carlsen and a match ball for the Norwegian

Update 17:45 CET

Lc0 -0.56 : 22. .. bxc6 23. dxc6 Rfc8 24. Qc4 Qe6 25. Nd5 Ra5 26. Nb6 d5 27. Qc3 Rb5 28. Qc2 Rc7 29. Na8 Rc8 30. Nb6 Rc7 31. Na8 Bb4+ 32. Ke2 Rc8 33. Nb6 Bc3 34. bxc3 Rxc6 35. Qxa4 Rb2+ 36. Kf1 d4 37. cxd4 Rxc1+ 38. Bxc1 Rxb6 39. Qa8+ Kh7 40. Qe4 Rb4 41. d5 Qa6+ 42. Qe2 Qb7 43. Kg2 Qxd5+ 44. Kh2 Rg4

SF128 -0.54 : 22. .. bxc6 23. dxc6 Rfc8 24. Qc4 Bd8 25. Ne4 Ba5+ 26. Ke2 Rcb8 27. Nxd6 Rxb2+ 28. Kf1 Qf3 29. Qe4 Qxe4 30. Nxe4 f5 31. Ng5 Rc8 32. a3 Ra2 33. Kg2 Rxa3 34. Ne6 Rc3 35. Rxc3 Bxc3

Update 17:38 CET

A premature 21. c5 sends the game from opening success for white to trouble

Lc0: -0.5 : 21. .. O-O 22. Rd1 Rfd8 23. f3 Qd7 24. cxd6 Bxd6 25. a3 Rdc8 26. Ne4 Ra5 27. O-O Ne7 28. Bf2 Rxd5 29. Kg2 Bb8 30. Nc3 Rd4 31. Bxd4 exd4 32. Rxd4 Qxd4 33. Qxe7 Ba7 34. Qe2 Qc4 35. Re1 Bd4 36. Qxc4 Rxc4 37. Re4 f5 38. Rf4 g6 39. Kf1 Kf7 40. Ne2 g5

SF128 -0.09 : 21. .. O-O 22. Rd1 Rfd8 23. cxd6 Bxd6 24. O-O a3 25. Bb6 Rd7 26. bxa3 Ra6 27. Rb1 Nxh4 28. gxh4 Bc7 29. Be3 Rg6+ 30. Bg5 f6 31. Qe4 Qxe4 32. Nxe4 Rxd5 33. Rfd1 Rxd1+ 34. Rxd1 fxg5 35. Nxg5 Rd6 36. Rb1 Rb6 37. Rc1 Rc6 38. Rd1 Bb6 39. Rb1 Bd8 40. Rxb7 Bxg5 41. hxg5 Kh7 42. Rb5 Kg6

Update 17:19 CET

An opening success for white, now we have Carlsen in deep thought:

Lc0 +0.85 : 17. .. O-O 18. Be2 Bd8 19. O-O Ne7 20. Bxh5 Nf5 21. Qd3 Qc8 22. Kh2 g6 23. Be2 Nxe3 24. Qxe3 f5 25. Qh6 Rf6 26. b4 Bb6 27. a3 Qf8 28. Qxf8+ Rfxf8 29. Kg2 Bd4 30. Rac1 Rac8 31. Rfd1 Kf7 32. f4 Rfe8 33. Rc2 b6 34. Bf1

SF128 + 0.68 : 17. .. Bd8 18. Be2 Ne7 19. Bxh5 O-O 20. Qd3 Nf5 21. Bg4 Qc8 22. O-O-O b5 23. Nxb5 Bxb5 24. Bxf5 Qxc4+ 25. Kb1 g6 26. Qxc4 Bxc4 27. Be4 f5 28. Rc1 Be2 29. Rhe1 Bb5 30. Bc2 Kg7 31. a3 Rf7 32. Rg1 Rc8 33. f3 Rfc7 34. Rg2 e4 35. fxe4 fxe4 36. Rd1 Bf6 37. Bxe4 Re8

Update 17:15 CET

Game 2 is underway with the well known 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5

Update 17:01 CET

The World Championship drama is here! In a difficult endgame, Caruana makes the final blunder with 37… Kxe4. Precise play from that point on by Carlsen to bring the full point home. A goal for Carlsen, 1-0

Update 16:55 CET

30. Rd5 was not the right way to try to go for a win. Now the position is equal

Update 16:45 CET

Lc0 : 29. .. c5 30. Rc1 Kd6 31. e5+ Kd5 32. e6 Kxe6 33. Rxc5 g6 34. Ra5 h5 35. h4 Ra2 36. a4 Rd2 37. Kf1 Ra2 38. Rxa6+ Kf5 39. Ke1 Ra3 40. Kf2 Ra2+ 41. Kf3 Ra3+ 42. Kg2 Ra2+ 43. Kh3 Ra1 44. a5 Ke4 45. Rxg6 Kf3 46. Kh2 Ra2+ 47. Kh3 Ra1 48. Kh2 Ra2+ 49. Kg1 Ra1+ 50. Kh2

SF128: 29. .. c5 30. Rc1 Kd6 31. a4 Rd2 32. e5+ Kd5 33. e6 Kxe6 34. Rxc5 g6 35. Re5+ Kf6 36. Ra5 Ke6 37. h4 h5 38. Kf1 Ra2 39. Ke1 Kf6 40. Rxa6+ Kf5 41. Ra5+ Ke4 42. Rg5 Rxa4 43. Rxg6 Kf3 44. Kd1 Ra3 45. Rg7 Ke4 46. Kd2 Rb3 47. Rg5 Ra3 48. Rg6 Rb3 49. Ke2 Rb2+ 50. Kd1 Ra2 51. Rg5 Ra1+ 52. Kc2 Ra3 53. Kb2 Rd3 54. Kc1 Ra3 55. Re5+ Kf3 56. Kb2 Rd3 57. Kc2 Ra3

Update 16:39 CET

Lc0 +2.5: 24. Rxd4 Kf7 25. Kh1 Ke7 26. Red1 Rb6 27. Rd6 c5 28. e5 a5 29. f4 Rxd6 30. Rxd6 Nf8 31. Rc6 h6 32. Rxc5 Rd4 33. Kg2 g5 34. fxg5 hxg5 35. Kf3 a4 36. Rc7+ Kd8 37. Rc6 Ke7 38. Ke3 Rd1 39. Ra6 Re1+ 40. Kd4 Rd1+ 41. Kc3 Re1 42. Ra7+ Kd8 43. Rxa4 Rxe5 44. Ra8+ Ke7 45. a4 Nd7 46. Ra7 Kd6 47. Ra6+ Ke7 48. a5 Nf6 49. Ra8 Re3+ 50. Kb4 Re4
Eval

SF128 +2.52 : 24. Rxd4 Kf7 25. Kh1 Ke7 26. Red1 Rbb8 27. Bxa6 c5 28. R4d2 Nb6 29. Rxd8 Rxd8 30. Rxd8 Kxd8 31. Kg1 Kc7 32. Kf2 c4 33. Ke3 Kd6 34. Kd4 e5+ 35. Kc3 Kc5 36. f4 Na4+ 37. Kc2 Kd4 38. fxe5 Nc5 39. Bb5 Kxe5 40. Kc3 Nxe4+ 41. Kxc4 Kd6 42. a4 Kc7 43. a5 Kb7 44. Kb4 Ka7 45. Bd3 Nf6 46. Kc5 Ng4 47. Bxh7

Update 16:35 CET

SF128 +1.5: 22. .. Nd4 23. Bxd4 exd4 24. Rxd4 Kf7 25. Kh1 Rbb8 26. Red1 Ke7 27. Bxa6 c5 28. R4d2 Nb6 29. Rxd8 Rxd8 30. Rb1 Nd7 31. a4 Ra8 32. Bb5 c4 33. Rc1 Nb6 34. Rc2 Rc8 35. Kg2 Kd6 36. Ba6 Rc5 37. f4 Nxa4 38. Bxc4 e5 39. Kf3 Nb6 40. Rd2+ Ke7 41. Bg8 h5 42. fxe5

Lc0 +2.52 : 22. .. Nd4 23. Bxd4 exd4 24. Bxe6+ Kf8 25. Rxd4 Ke7 26. Rxd7+ Rxd7 27. Bxd7 Kxd7 28. Rd1+ Ke7 29. f4 c5 30. e5 Ke6 31. Rd6+ Kf5 32. Rxa6 Ke4 33. Kf1 Rxh2 34. Ke1 Kf3 35. Kd1 Rh1+ 36. Kd2 Rh2+ 37. Kd3 Kxg3 38. Ra4 Kf3 39. e6 Re2 40. f5 Re5 41. Ra7 g6 42. fxg6 hxg6 43. Rf7+ Kg4 44. e7 g5 45. Kc4 Kh5 46. a4

Update 16:31 CET

Nervs kick in, Caruana misses the obvious 19… Nb7 and goes Nb5 instead, engine evals call it a blunder, jumping to +1.90!

Update 16:21 CET

Magnus Carlsen missed the most critical line and after 14. Be3 the position is stabilizing for black. Now at move 17 Lc0 eval is +0.3, SF128 is +0.09

Update 16:17 CET

After 12. Na4 many possibilities for Caruana, none looks good in the eyes of Leela

Line 1 +0.9: 12. .. Be6 13. Qxd8 Rxd8 14. f4 c3 15. Nxc3 Bb3 16. h3 Nbd7 17. Be3 Rab8 18. Rf2 Re8 19. Rd2 Nb6 20. Bf1 Bc4 21. Bxb6 Bxf1 22. Bc7 Rb7 23. Bxe5 Bxh3 24. b4 Nd7 25. Bd6 h5 26. Rc1 a5 27. bxa5 Rb3 28. Rd4 Ra8 29. Rb4 Rxa3 30. Rb8+ Nxb8

Line 2 +0.92: 12. .. Nbd7 13. Qc2 Nb6 14. Nxb6 Qxb6 15. Qxc4 Be6 16. Qc3 Qd4 17. Qxd4 exd4 18. Bf4 Rfd8 19. Rfc1 Rac8 20. b4 h6 21. f3 Nd7 22. Bf1 g5

SF128 +0.57: 12. .. Be6 13. f4 c3 14. Qc2 exf4 15. gxf4 Qd4+ 16. Kh1 Nbd7 17. bxc3 Qc4 18. Nb2 Qb3 19. Qxb3 Bxb3 20. e5 Nd5 21. c4 Ne7 22. Rf2 g6 23. Be3 Nf5 24. Re1 Rfc8 25. Bh3 Rab8 26. Bxf5 gxf5 27. Rg1+ Kf8 28. Rd2 Rb7 29. Bf2 c5 30. Rg3 Ba2 31. h3 Bb1 32. Nd3 Rb6 33. a4 Rg6 34. Rxg6 hxg6 35. a5 Kg7 36. Kg2 g5 37. fxg5 Bxd3 38. Rxd3 Nxe5 39. Rd5 Nxc4 40. Rxf5 Nxa5 41. Bxc5 Nb3

Update 16:15 CET

Lc0 critical variation in game 1: 11. dxe5 dxe5 12. Be3 Qe7 13. Na4 Nbd7 14. Qd2 a5 15. Rfd1 Ng4 16. Bb6 Ngf6 17. Bxa5 c5 18. Nb6 Nxb6 19. Bxb6 Ra6 20. Ba5 Bd7 21. Re1 Rd6 22. Qc1 Ra8 23. Bc3 Bc6 24. Qg5 Rd4 25. f4 h6 26. Qxe5 Qa7 27. f5 Re8 28. Qf4 Qb7 29. a4 Nxe4 30. Bxd4 cxd4

Eval +0.91

Update 16:10 CET

Now after 8… d6 the neural network Lc0 is saying the position for black is “difficult to play” +0.61 9. a3 Ba5 10. b4 Bc7 11. cxb5 axb5 12. d5 Bb6 13. dxc6 Nxc6 14. Bg5 Bg4 15. Nxb5 h6 16. Bxf6 Qxf6 17. Nbc3 Nd4 18. Qd3 Nxe2+ 19. Nxe2 Be6 20. a4 Rfc8 21. a5 Ba7 22. Rac1 Rxc1 23. Nxc1 Rc8 24. Qd2 Bc4 25. Nd3 Ba6 26. Rc1 Rxc1+ 27. Nxc1 Qe6 28. Bf1

The clock of Caruana agrees, this is an opening success for Carlsen

Update 16:01 CET

Game 1 we have the English opening with 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. g3 Bb4 4. e4 which is a different variation of the opening that we have seen so far

Lc0 line 1 +0.3 : 6. .. d6 7. O-O Nbd7 8. a3 Ba5 9. Qc2 Bb6 10. Na4 Bc7 11. d4 Nb6 12. Nxb6 Bxb6 13. Rd1 Qe7 14. b4 a5 15. c5 Bc7 16. Bb2 Re8 17. cxd6 Bxd6 18. dxe5 Bxe5 19. Bxe5 Qxe5 20. Qc3 Qxc3 21. Nxc3 axb4 22. axb4

Lc0 line 2 +0.31 : 6. .. Re8 7. O-O d6 8. a3 Ba5 9. h3 Nbd7 10. Qc2 Bb6 11. Na4 Bc7 12. d4 a6 13. Rd1 b5 14. cxb5 axb5 15. Nac3 b4 16. Na4 Ba6 17. axb4 Bxe2 18. Qxe2

SF 128 +0.39 : 6. .. a6 7. O-O d6 8. d4 exd4 9. Nxd4 Nbd7 10. Nce2 Re8 11. a3 Bc5 12. b4 Bb6 13. Qc2 c5 14. Nf5 Ne5 15. Bf4 h6 16. Rfd1 Bxf5 17. exf5 Qe7 18. Rab1 cxb4 19. Rxb4 Qc7 20. Qb3 Bc5 21. Rxb7 Rab8 22. Rxc7 Rxb3 23. Bxe5 Rxe5 24. Nd4 Rb2 25. Rc8+ Kh7

Update 15:43 CET

Reminder of the current score in blitz and rapid from historical point of view. Carlsen leads Caruana 15,0 – 8,0, with Carlsen winning 13 games, Caruana winning 6 games, and 4 games finishing draw.

Update 15:30 CET

The tiebreak drama is here! Today is the day when we will know the new world chess champion. Even in the unlikely case where we do not have a single decisive game, there will be a new champion crowned. Carlsen and Caruana will start with best-of-four rapid games with time control 25 minutes for each player with an increment of 10 seconds after each move. In case of a 2-2 score we will have up to 5 pairs of blitz games with time control 5 minutes plus 3 seconds increment after each move. In case of another tie, there will be the famous Armageddon, where in case of draw the player with the black pieces will be crowned champion

Carlsen will start with the white pieces, as per the draw conducted during the last press conference.

Watch live video from TCEC_Chess_TV on www.twitch.tv

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Caruana – Carlsen 2018 game 12 LIVE!

Mon, 11/26/2018 - 16:12

Replay: Caruana – Carlsen game 1 / Carlsen – Caruana game 2 / Caruana – Carlsen game 3 / Carlsen – Caruana game 4 / Caruana – Carlsen game 5 / Carlsen – Caruana game 6 / Carlsen – Caruana game 7 / Caruana – Carlsen game 8 / Caruana – Carlsen game 9 / Caruana – Carlsen game 10

Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the 2018 World Chess Championship match between the reigning champion Magnus Carlsen (Norway) and the challenger Fabiano Caruana (USA). In this live blog + live games from WCC 2018 we will be covering the event Carlsen – Caruana with the latest news, developments, interviews, and in-game details.

The most important feature here will be the lines of analysis by Lc0 – the open Neural Network, and the TCEC champion Stockfish running on a Super Computer of 128 cores.

 

Refresh the page to get the latest updates

Update 19:07 CET

Thematic! The players agree to a draw, despite all the grind possibilities that black have

Update 18:41 CET

Lc0 -2.15: 29. .. Ba4 30. Rcc1 b5 31. Bd4 Bxd4 32. Qxd4 bxc4 33. Rxc4 Bb5 34. Rc3 Qb8 35. Bxb5 Qxb5 36. Rec1 Rc7 37. R1c2 Rb8 38. Qc4 Rcb7 39. Nd1 Qe8 40. Qd4 Qg6 41. a3 Kh7 42. Ka2 Nd3 43. Qe3 Qf7 44. Qd4 Nc5 45. Ne3 Nd3

Update 18:35 CET

However, closing the center with e4 is problematic. Now white has easier moves, according to Lc0. For example:

29. Nh3 g6 30. Ng5 Ba4 31. b3 Bd7 32. Bd4 Bxd4 33. Qxd4 Qb6 34. Qb2 Qb4 35. Rc3 Rb8 36. Rd2 Ra8 37. Rd1 Qb6 38. Rc2 Ra6 39. Rdd2 Qd8 40. Qc3 Qf6 41. Qxf6 Rxf6 42. Kb2 Rf8 43. Kc3 Rb6 44. Rc1 Rc8 45. Rdc2

Update 18:23 CET

No, 25… a5 is not a blunder. It is a statement by Magnus. He knows he is better and not by a little. Best move by Caruana here is Qa3, not looking nice for white’s pieces coordinaton

SF128 -0.85: 26. Qa3 b6 27. Nh3 Be8 28. Be2 g6 29. Kb1 Ba4 30. b3 Bd7 31. Qc1 Bf6 32. fxe5 Bxe5 33. Nf4 Kh7 34. Bf3 Qd8 35. Bd4 Qf6 36. Qe3 Rfe8 37. Bc3 Bxc3 38. Qxc3 Qxc3 39. Rxc3 Re7 40. Rdc1 Rce8 41. Kb2 Kg7 42. Kb1 Kf6 43. Kb2 Re3 44. Bg2 Rxc3 45. Rxc3 b5 46. cxb5 Bxb5 47. Bf3 Ne4 48. Bxe4 fxe4

Update 18:15 CET

f4 by Caruana and the position gets concrete, but also more difficult for the American. Magnus with significant advantage:

Lc0 -1.7: 25. .. exf4 26. Bxf4 b5 27. Bf1 a5 28. Qd2 b4 29. Nd3 b3 30. Nxc5 bxc2 31. Re1 Qxc5 32. Rxe7 Qg1 33. Qg2 Qd4 34. Qd2 Qg1 35. Qg2 Qxg2 36. Bxg2 Rxc4 37. Bxd6 f4 38. Be5 Rf7 39. Rxf7 Kxf7 40. gxf4 Bf5 41. b3 Rb4 42. d6 Ke8 43. Bd5 a4 44. a3 Rb6 45. b4 Kd7 46. Bc4 g6 47. Bd5 Rb8 48. Bc4 Kc6 49. Ba6 Rd8 50. Bc4 Be4 51. Ba6 Bf5 52. Bc4

SF128 -1.51: 25. .. exf4 26. gxf4 Bxh4 27. Qd2 Nxd3+ 28. Qxd3 b5 29. Bd4 Qf7 30. c5 dxc5 31. Be5 c4 32. Qd4 Bf6 33. Nh3 Bxe5 34. Qxe5 Rfe8 35. Ng5 Qf6 36. Qxf6 gxf6 37. Ne6 Kf7 38. Rc3 b4 39. Rh3 a5 40. Nd4 Re7 41. Nc6 Rd7 42. a3 b3 43. Rc3 h4 44. Nxa5 Rc5 45. Nxc4 Rcxd5 46. Rxd5 Rxd5 47. Ne3 Rd4 48. Rxb3 Rxf4 49. Rb7+ Ke6

Update 18:10 CET

After 24. Nf2, a rather passive move compared to 24. Ng5, Carlsen increases his advantage

Lc0 -0.77: 24. .. b6 25. Nh3 Nc5 26. f4 Rfe8 27. Qd2 Bf6 28. Ng5 a5 29. Kb1 Rb8 30. fxe5 dxe5 31. Rcc1 Qd6 32. Bc2 e4 33. Bf4 Be5 34. Qe3 Qf6 35. Bxe5 Qxe5 36. Nh3 Bf7 37. Nf4

SF128 -0.79: 24. .. Nc5 25. Bxc5 Qxc5 26. Qxc5 Rxc5 27. Kd2 Be8 28. Ke2 Bd7 29. Rh1 Ra5 30. a3 b5 31. Rhc1 Bd8 32. c5 dxc5 33. Rxc5 Bb6 34. Rc6 Bxc6 35. dxc6 e4 36. Bc2 b4 37. Bb3+ Kh7 38. axb4 Re5 39. fxe4 Bc7 40. Bc4 Rb8 41. Nd3 Rxe4+ 42. Kf3 Rg4 43. Nf4 Bxf4 44. gxf4 Rxb4

Update 17:39 CET

Caruana blinks, 21. Rh2 is the first move not present in the top lines of Lc0 and SF128. The position on the board will get sharp now:

Lc0 -0.7 : 21. .. Bg6 22. O-O-O Rac8 23. Rc2 f5 24. Ng5 Bxg5 25. hxg5 e4 26. Bf1 f4 27. Bxf4 Nc5 28. fxe4 Rce8 29. Qa3 h4 30. Rh2 Rxe4 31. Rxh4 a5 32. Qc3 a4 33. Qc2 Rfe8 34. Be3 Rxc4 35. Qxc4 b5 36. Qxc5 dxc5 37. d6 Qc6 38. d7 Rd8 39. Bh3 a3 40. bxa3 c4 41. Rf4 c3 42. Bd4 Qa6 43. Bxc3 Qxa3+ 44. Kd2 Qxa2+ 45. Ke1 Qb3 46. Rf3 b4 47. Rd6

SF128 -0.41 : 21. .. Bg6 22. O-O-O Rac8 23. Rc2 f5 24. Ng5 e4 25. Bf1 a5 26. Qe1 Bxg5 27. hxg5 exf3 28. Bf4 Rfe8 29. Qc3 Qc5 30. Qxf3 b5 31. Qg2 b4 32. Kb1 Ne5 33. Rcc1 Ng4 34. Re1 Re4 35. Bd3 Rxe1 36. Rxe1 Nf2 37. Bc2 Ne4 38. Bd3 a4 39. Be3 Qc7 40. Bxe4 fxe4 41. Rc1 Rf8 42. Qd2 Rf3 43. c5 dxc5

Update 17:30 CET

Lc0 already believes it is easier to play with black. The 128 cores Stockfish stays calm.

Lc0 -0.08: 19. .. Nd7 20. Qd2 Bxe4 21. fxe4 Nf6 22. Bd3 Ng4 23. O-O Nxe3 24. Qxe3 a5 25. Rac1

SF128 +0.4: 19. .. Nd7 20. Qd2 Nc5 21. Nf2 a5 22. b3 Bg6 23. Rc1 Qd7 24. Qd1 Bf6 25. Qd2 Bd8 26. Qd1 f5 27. Bxc5

Update 16:35 CET

16… Qc7 is a strange move by Carlsen. Instead of developing the bishop, he prefers another setup. The engines do not think it is the most optimal, but it is of course an ok move

Lc0 +0.41 : 17. Qa4+ Bd7 18. Qb3 Be7 19. g3 Bg4 20. Qa4+ Bd7 21. Qb3 Bg4 22. Ne4 O-O 23. f3 Bd7 24. Bb6 Qc8 25. O-O-O f5 26. Ng5 f4 27. Bd3 Bf5 28. g4 hxg4 29. fxg4 Bxd3

SF128 +0.31: : 17. g3 Be7 18. Be2 Nf8 19. Na4 Nd7 20. O-O Bg6 21. Nb6 Nxb6 22. Bxb6 Qd7 23. Rfe1 O-O 24. Bf1 Bd8 25. Rac1 a5 26. Qb3 a4 27. Qb4 f5 28. Bh3 Bxb6 29. Qxb6 Ra6 30. Qe3 e4 31. Kh2 Qe7 32. Qg5 Qxg5 33. hxg5 f4
Eval

Update 16:30 CET

Different approaches are possible in this position

Lc0: 15. .. a6 16. Nc3 Be7 17. Qxb7 O-O 18. O-O-O Nxh4 19. Qb6 Qd7 20. Qc6 Qd8 21. Qb6 Qd7 22. Qc6 Qd8 23. c5 Bg4 24. Qa4 Bxd1 25. Qxd1 g6 26. Bd3 Qc8 27. cxd6 Bf6 28. Qa4 Nxg2 29. d7 Qb7 30. Ne4 Be7 31. d6 Bd8 32. Bh6 Nf4 33. Rd1 Nxd3+ 34. Rxd3 h4 35. Bxf8

SF128: 15. .. Be7 16. Nxa7 O-O 17. a4 Bg4 18. Bb6 Qd7 19. f3 Bf5 20. g3 Bd8 21. Bxd8 Rfxd8 22. Nb5 e4 23. f4 e3 24. Nd4 Ne7 25. b3 Re8 26. O-O-O Bg4 27. Be2 Bxe2 28. Nxe2 Qg4 29. Rde1 Qg6 30. Rhg1 Nf5 31. Kb2 Qf6+ 32. Qc3 Qg6 33. Ka3 Rec8 34. Ka2

Update 16:25 CET

After one repetition:

Lc0 +0.6: 15. Bg5 Qb8 16. Be2 a6 17. Nc3 Qc7 18. g3 Be7 19. Be3 Nf8 20. Qb6 Qc8 21. Qb3 Nd7 22. Rc1 Bg6 23. Qd1 Nf6 24. Na4 Qf5 25. Nb6 Rd8 26. Qa4+ Kf8 27. Qd1 Kg8 28. b4 Ng4

SF128 +0.52: 15. Bg5 Qb8 16. g3 a6 17. Nc3 Be7 18. Be3 Nf8 19. Be2 Nd7 20. O-O Bg6 21. Na4 O-O 22. Nb6 Nxb6 23. Qxb6 f5 24. f4 Bd8 25. Qb3 Bf6 26. Kg2 Qd8 27. Rae1 e4 28. a4 a5 29. c5 Qc7 30. Rc1 Bf7 31. Rfd1 Rfc8 32. Rc2 Qd7 33. Rdc1

Update 16:17 CET

Fabiano has several choices, the most active one at this moment is Bg5. The move 12 …h5 by Magnus Carlsen is a novelty, so Caruana will take his time on this move.

Lc0 +0.6: 13. Bg5 Qb8 14. Be2 a6 15. Nc3 Qc7 16. g3 Be7 17. Rd1 Nf8 18. a4 b6 19. Qa3 Nd7 20. b4 Bxg5 21. hxg5 Ke7 22. Rh4 g6 23. a5 bxa5 24. bxa5

Update 16:15 CET

The players continue following Lc0′s line with 10. Qa4 Bd7 11. Qb4 but then Magnus goes Bf5 instead of Qb8

SF 128 +0.22: 12. Be3 Qd7 13. a4 f6 14. g4 a6 15. Ke2 h5 16. gxh5 Rd8

Lc0 +0.65: 12. h4 Be7 13. h5 Nf4 14. Be3 O-O 15. Qd2 a6 16. Nc3 g6 17. hxg6 fxg6 18. a4 Rc8 19. a5 Rf7 20. b3 Bf6 21. g3 Bg4 22. Rh2 Bg7 23. Ne4 h5 24. c5 dxc5 25. d6 Bf3 26. Ra4 Ne6 27. Bc4 Qd7 28. Qd3 Rc6 29. Bd5

If Qa4 with repetition then we have

Lc0 +0.6: 12. Qa4 Bd7 13. Qb4 Bf5 14. Bg5 Qd7 15. Qa4 Rc8 16. Qxa7 h6 17. Be3 Be7 18. Qa4 O-O 19. Qb3 Nh4 20. Rg1 Bg6

Update 16:03 CET

The open Sicilian is on the board for the third time during this match, with Sveshnikov variation once again. Magnus Carlsen is the first to deviate with Ne7

Lc0 +0.62: 10. Qa4 Bd7 11. Qb4 Qb8 12. h4 h5 13. Be2 a6 14. Nc3 Ne7 15. a4 a5 16. Qa3 Nf5 17. Bg5 f6 18. Bd2 Kf7 19. Bd3 g6 20. b4 Be7 21. bxa5 Rxa5 22. Nb5 Ra6 23. a5 b6 24. O-O

Update 15:00 CET

In less than 1 hour the last classical game between Caruana and Carlsen will begin. Caruana has the white pieces and this is his last chance to avoid tiebreaks. Will he take it? Eight years ago in Sofia, Veselin Topalov tried to take the last game from Vishy Anand and avoid tiebreaks. The result was disastrous as he lost the World Championship outright.

For sure today we will have another theoretical battle on the board. Caruana is expected to enter a sideline, but not the most bizarre one, rather a line that gives him small permanent advantage.

Watch live video from TCEC_Chess_TV on www.twitch.tv

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Carlsen – Caruana 2018 game 11 LIVE!

Sat, 11/24/2018 - 16:32

Replay: Caruana – Carlsen game 1 / Carlsen – Caruana game 2 / Caruana – Carlsen game 3 / Carlsen – Caruana game 4 / Caruana – Carlsen game 5 / Carlsen – Caruana game 6 / Carlsen – Caruana game 7 / Caruana – Carlsen game 8 / Caruana – Carlsen game 9 / Caruana – Carlsen game 10

Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the 2018 World Chess Championship match between the reigning champion Magnus Carlsen (Norway) and the challenger Fabiano Caruana (USA). In this live blog + live games from WCC 2018 we will be covering the event Carlsen – Caruana with the latest news, developments, interviews, and in-game details.

The most important feature here will be the lines of analysis by Lc0 – the open Neural Network, and the TCEC champion Stockfish running on a Super Computer of 128 cores.

 

Refresh the page to get the latest updates

 

Current move eval: Move 10: Lc0 +0.42 , SF[128] +0.21

Update 18:25 CET

Draw 11 of the match is a fact. Unambitious opening by white and precise play by black leave the score equal at 5,5-5,5

Update 16:45 CET

Similar pawn structures and opposite color bishops. This game is going towards a draw.

Update 16:35 CET

After move 14 it is clear that Carlsen will be happy with rapid tiebreak. Why would he go into such a drawish opening with early queens exchange? The game still has to continue until move 30 and the players are obliged to show they know the right continuation.

Update 16:03 CET

We have 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Nc3 and this is Petrov, Caruana’s pet defence. It was expected to see it from him, the question here is if Carlsen’s team found something new.

Lc0 +0.42: 11. Bg5 Be6 12. Rhe1 c4 13. Bf1 d5 14. Nd4 Qa5 15. Kb1 Rae8 16. f3 Qb6 17. Re5 Ba3 18. Qc1 Nd7 19. Ree1 h6 20. Be3 Bc5 21. Qd2 Nf6 22. Ka1 a5 23. g4 Bd7 24. h4 Re7 25. g5 hxg5 26. hxg5 Nh5 27. Qh2 g6 28. Bf2 Rxe1 29. Rxe1 Bd6 30. Qg1

SF128 +0.22: 11. Rhe1 Be6 12. Kb1 Qa5 13. c4 Qxd2 14. Bxd2 h6 15. h3 Rfe8 16. b3 Rad8 17. Ba5 b6 18. Bc3 d5 19. Ne5 d4 20. Bb2 Rd6 21. c3 dxc3 22. Bxc3 Red8 23. Kc2 Ne8 24. Be4 Rxd1 25. Rxd1 Rxd1 26. Kxd1 Bf6 27. f4 h5 28. Bf3 h4 29. Kd2 Kf8 30. Kd3 Bf5+ 31. Be4 Bxe4+ 32. Kxe4 Ke7 33. Kf5 Nd6+ 34. Kg4 Ke6 35. Bb2 Be7

Update 15:30 CET

Ten games and ten draws so far at the World Chess Championship. Many are contemplating the possibility that we are going to have a classical world champion without winning a single classical game.

Game 11 is today and this is the last game with white for Carlsen. The stakes are nerve wrecking, will we see another draw or a player will cruise to a victory at the very end of the match?

Watch live video from TCEC_Chess_TV on www.twitch.tv

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Caruana – Carlsen 2018 game 10 LIVE!

Thu, 11/22/2018 - 16:20

Replay: Caruana – Carlsen game 1 / Carlsen – Caruana game 2 / Caruana – Carlsen game 3 / Carlsen – Caruana game 4 / Caruana – Carlsen game 5 / Carlsen – Caruana game 6 / Carlsen – Caruana game 7 / Caruana – Carlsen game 8 / Caruana – Carlsen game 9

Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the 2018 World Chess Championship match between the reigning champion Magnus Carlsen (Norway) and the challenger Fabiano Caruana (USA). In this live blog + live games from WCC 2018 we will be covering the event Carlsen – Caruana with the latest news, developments, interviews, and in-game details.

The most important feature here will be the lines of analysis by Lc0 – the open Neural Network, and the TCEC champion Stockfish running on a Super Computer of 128 cores.

 

Refresh the page to get the latest updates

 

Current move eval: Move 44: Lc0 +1.07 , SF[128] +0.18

Update 21:05 CET

Carlsen handled the endgame well and the 10th consecutive draw of this match is a fact. Two more games remain from the classical time control, in game 11 Carlsen will have white.

Update 20:51 CET

44… Kd4 is a strange risk by Carlsen, allowing 45. Rb5 . Some difficult lines ahead, with 45. …e3 probably the only move that leaves decent chances for draw, …Rd6 is possible and …Kc4 looks much more difficult to handle

Lc0 +1.07: 45. Rb5 Rd6 46. Ra4+ Ke5 47. Rab4 Ke6 48. c3 Rc6 49. Rd4 Rd6 50. Rdb4 Rc6 51. Rd4 Rd6 52. c4 dxc4 53. Rxe4+ Kf7 54. Rxc4 Rdxb6 55. Ra5 g5 56. Rc8 Kg7 57. Raa8 Rb1 58. Kxf3 Rg1 59. Rg8+ Kh7 60. Rh8+ Kg7 61. Rag8+ Kf7 62. Rb8 Rxb8 63. Rxb8 Re1 64. Rd8 Re6 65. Rd4 Rf6+ 66. Ke3 Ra6 67. Rd7+ Kg8 68. Ke4 Rf6 69. f3 Rf4+

SF128 +0.18: 45. Rb5 e3 46. Ra4+ Ke5 47. fxe3 Rbxb6 48. Rxb6 Rxb6 49. Kxf3 Rc6 50. Ra7 g5 51. hxg6 Rf6+ 52. Ke2 Rxg6 53. Ra4 Rg5 54. Rf4 h5 55. gxh5 Rxh5 56. Rd4 Rh2+ 57. Kd3 Rh3 58. Ra4 Rh2 59. Ra5 Kd6 60. Ra6+ Ke5 61. Rg6 Rh5 62. Rg4 Rh2 63. Rg5+ Kd6 64. Rg6+ Kd7 65. Ra6 Rh5 66. Kd4 Rh2 67. Ra7+ Kd6 68. Ra2 Rh4+ 69. Kc3 Rh2 70. Ra6+ Ke5 71. Ra8 Rg2 72. Re8+ Kd6 73. Rd8+ Kc5 74. Kd3 Rg3 75. Rd7 Rh3

Update 18:53 CET

Caruana does not believe in taking the pawn and goes g3

Lc0 -0.09: 24. .. Bf6 25. Bxb5 Bg4 26. Be2 f3 27. Bb5 Be5 28. Bd4 h5 29. Rg1 Bh3 30. a6 Qf6 31. Bxe5 Qxe5 32. Re3 h4 33. Bf1 Bxf1 34. Qxf1 hxg3 35. Rxg3 Qxd5 36. Qa1 Rf7 37. Qa4 Re7 38. Rg4 Rae8 39. h3 Qh5 40. Kh2 Qe5+ 41. Kh1 d5 42. Re1 e3 43. Rxe3 Qh5 44. Rg3

SF128 +0.00: 24. .. b4 25. gxf4 Qxf4 26. Rg3 Bh4 27. Rb3 Bf6 28. Rg1 Be5 29. Rg2 Bc3 30. Be3 Qf7 31. Bh6 Ra7 32. Rxg7+ Bxg7 33. Bxg7 Qxg7 34. Rg3 Bh3 35. Qd4 Kh8 36. Rxg7 Rxg7 37. a6 Re8 38. a7 Ra8 39. Qxb4 Raxa7 40. Qb8+ Rg8 41. Qxa7 Bg2+ 42. Kg1 Bh3+

Example line with …Kc4 : 45. .. Kc4 46. Raa5 Rd6 47. Rc5+ Kd4 48. c3+ Ke5 49. c4 Rbxb6 50. Rxd5+ Rxd5 51. Rxd5+ Ke6 52. Kf4 Rb2 53. Re5+ Kd6 54. Rxe4 Rxf2 55. Ke3 Rf1 56. Rf4 Rc1 57. Rd4+ Kc5 58. Rd7 Rc3+ 59. Kf2 Kxc4 60. Kg3 Ra3 61. Rxg7 Kd4 62. Rg6 f2+ 63. Kxf2 Ke5 64. Rxh6 Kf4 65. Rg6 Ra2+ 66. Ke1 Rh2 67. h6

Update 18:25 CET

Carlsen loses his advantage with one move, Qg5. Chances for Caruana!

Lc0 +1.09: 24. Bxb5 Rf6 25. Re1 Bf5 26. Ra4 f3 27. g3 Qg4 28. Re3 Rh6 29. Qg1 Bg5 30. a6 Qh5 31. Bf1 Bxe3 32. Bxe3 Qe8 33. Rb4 Rf6 34. Bb5 Qc8 35. Qb1 Rxa6 36. Bxa6 Qxa6 37. h4 h6 38. Kh2 Kh7 39. Rb7 Qc4 40. Qa1 Rg6 41. h5 Rg4 42. Re7 Bc8 43. Qf6 Qf1 44. Qxh6+ Kg8 45. Re8+ Kf7 46. Rf8+

SF 128 +1.26: 24. Bxb5 Bd8 25. Bxd8 Qxd8 26. Qd2 Qc7 27. Rfa1 Qc5 28. Rb3 Bb7 29. c4 Bc8 30. a6 Ra7 31. Kg1 h6 32. h3 Re7 33. Qb4 Qd4 34. Qc3 Qc5 35. Re1 Rff7 36. Qb4 Qb6 37. Qa3 e3 38. fxe3 f3 39. Rf1 fxg2

Update 17:10 CET

Now this is a surprise! Caruana plays 19. Ra3?! Definite blunder according to the neural network Lc0, which immediately goes to +0.14, dropping half a pawn eval. For SF128 the drop is bigger and it shows a full pawn less of evaluation -0.14! If Carlsen was still in prep on move 18, has he considered this move?

Lc0 line 1: 19. .. e4 20. Bd4 Qg6 21. Kh1 Bf6 22. Rc3 Kh8 23. Re1 Qh6 24. Bf1 Qg6 25. h3 h6 26. Rb3 Bxd4 27. Qxd4 e3 28. fxe3 Qg3 29. Rbb1 f3 30. Qg4 Qf2 31. gxf3 Ne5 32. Qg2 Qh4 33. Nxe5 dxe5 34. Red1 Rf5 35. d6 Bd7 36. Rxb7 Rg5 37. Qh2

Lc0 line 2: 19. .. Qg6 20. Re1 Nf6 21. Bc7 e4 22. Nb6 Ra6 23. Nxc8 Rxc8 24. Bb6 f3 25. Bf1 Bd8 26. Bxd8 Rxd8 27. Qb1 Rd7 28. c4 Ra8 29. h3 Re7 30. Qb4 Rd7 31. Qb1 Re7 32. Qb6 Rd7 33. Kh1 fxg2+ 34. Bxg2 Rf8 35. Rae3 Qh6 36. Kg1 Qf4 37. Bxe4 Nxe4 38. Rxe4 Qg5+ 39. Rg4 Qd2 40. Qe3

SF128: 19. .. Qg6 20. Rb3 Nf6 21. f3 Bh3 22. Rf2 Bf5 23. Bd3 Rf7 24. Bxf5 Qxf5 25. Re2 Rc8 26. Qd3 Qxd3 27. cxd3 Nxd5 28. Bf2 Bf8 29. Re1 g6 30. Kf1 Rcc7 31. Rb5 Nc3 32. Rb6 Rfd7 33. Rb3 Nd5 34. Rb5 Nc3

Update 16:55 CET

Carlsen plays 18…Qe8 relatively fast, leaving the audience to wonder if he is still in preparation.

Lc0 line 1 +0.71: 19. Bc7 Qg6 20. Re1 Nc5 21. Bh5 Qf6 22. Bb6 Na6 23. Rb1 Bf5 24. Bg4 g6 25. Be2 Rf7 26. f3 Rc8 27. Rb5 Nc7 28. Rb3 Bf8 29. Bd3 Na6 30. Rb5 Nc7 31. Rb3 Na6 32. Qb1 Qg5 33. Bf1 Qf6 34. Bd3 Qg5 35. Bf1 Qf6 36. Bf2 Nc5 37. Rb5 e4 38. Rxc5 e3 39. Bxe3 dxc5 40. Bf2 h6 41. Qb3 Kh7 42. h4 Rd8 43. Nd2 Rfd7 44. c4 Ra8 45. Ne4 Bxe4 46. Rxe4 Re7 47. Rxe7+ Qxe7 48. Qb5 h5 49. Bd3 Qc7 50. Be1 Bg7 51. Be4 Bd4+ 52. Kf1 Kh6 53. Bd2 Be3 54. Bc3

Lc0 line 2 +0.61:19. Re1 Qg6 20. Bc7 Nc5 21. Bh5 Qf6 22. Bb6 Nd7 23. Bc7 Nc5 24. Nb6 Ra6 25. Nxc8 Rxc8 26. Bb6 Bd8 27. Bg4 Bxb6 28. Bxc8 Bxa5 29. Rf1 g6 30. g3 Kg7 31. Qf3 Bd2 32. Rxa6 bxa6 33. Qe2 Bc3 34. Qf3 Bd4 35. c3 e4 36. Qxf4 Qxf4 37. gxf4 Bxc3

SF Dev spikes after several minutes thinking time and changes the evaluation from 0.41 to 0.84. Probably the best continuation so far:

SF Dev 128: 19. Re1 Nxb6 20. Nxb6 Ra7 21. Bd3 f3 22. c4 fxg2 23. Nxc8 Qxc8 24. Qh5 h6 25. Qg6 Rf6 26. Qh7+ Kf7 27. Ra3 Qg8 28. Qe4 Qa8 29. Rea1 Qc8 30. Bc2 Ke8 31. Kxg2 Qc5 32. f3 Qd4 33. Qh7 Qxc4 34. Kh1 Bf8 35. Rb1 Qf4 36. Qd3 Kf7 37. Qb5 Kg8 38. Be4 Qd2 39. Rba1 Qd4 40. Qe8 Kh8 41. R3a2 Qc3 42. Qb8 Qe3 43. Rf1 Rf7 44. Qe8 Rf6 45. Raa1 Ra6 46. Rg1 Ra7 47. Rac1 b5 48. Qxb5 Rxf3 49. Bxf3 Qxf3+ 50. Rg2 Rf7 51. Qe2

Update 16:45 CET

We are at move 18 and both engines seem worried for black. 18… Qb6 and 18… Nxb6 are on the table, with Lc0 and SF128 giving preference to the queen move. Deep lines show the difficulty that Magnus Carlsen is going to face in the next moves

Lc0 +0.71: 18. .. Qe8 19. Bc7 Qg6 20. Re1 Nc5 21. Bh5 Qf6 22. Bb6 Na6 23. Rb1 Bf5 24. Bg4 g6 25. Be2 Rf7 26. f3 Rc8 27. Bd3 Bf8 28. Rb5 Nc7 29. Rb3 Na6 30. Rb5 Nc7 31. Rb3 Na6 32. Qb1 Qg7 33. Nd2 Nc5 34. Bxc5 Rxc5 35. Rb5 Rfc7 36. c4 Qd7 37. Be4 Be7 38. Qb3 Qc8 39. h3 Bd7 40. Rxc5 Rxc5 41. Ra1 Bd8 42. Qb4 Qc7 43. a6 bxa6 44. Rxa6 Ra5 45. Qxd6 Rxa6 46. Qxa6 Qc5+ 47. Kh1 Bb6 48. Qa1 Qe3 49. c5 Bxc5 50. Nc4 Qd4

Update 16:03 CET

For the second time in the match the open Sicilian. This time it is Fabiano Caruana who deviates with 11. b4, a move that is not very typical for the Sveshnikov at this stage.

Lc0 +0.29: 12. .. a6 13. Na3 b6 14. Nc4 a5 15. bxa5 bxa5 16. Bd2 Bb7 17. Qe1 Qc8 18. Bxa5 Bxd5 19. Ne3 Be6 20. Bf3 Ra7 21. Qd2 h6 22. Bb4 Rd8 23. a5 Nc5 24. Nd5 Bg5 25. Qe2 f5 26. Nb6 Qa6 27. Bc3 Rc7 28. Rfd1 e4 29. Bh5 g6 30. h4 Bxh4 31. Qe3 Bg5 32. Qd4 Kh7 33. f4

Lc0 line 2 +0.3: 14. 12. .. f5 13. a5 a6 14. Na3 f4 15. Nc4 e4 16. Nd2 Nf6 17. Ra3 Qe8 18. Nc4 f3 19. gxf3 Bh3 20. f4 Bxf1 21. Kxf1 Qf7 22. Nb6 Rae8 23. Rg3 Bd8 24. Nc4 Qd7 25. Ne3 b6 26. b5 bxa5 27. bxa6 Bb6 28. Bb2 Rb8

SF128 +0.07: 12. .. a6 13. Na3 b6 14. f4 f5 15. Nc4 a5 16. Rb1 axb4 17. Rxb4 Qc7 18. Kh1 Ba6 19. Be3 Bxc4 20. Bxc4 exf4 21. Bxf4 Nc5 22. Bb5 Bf6 23. Bc6 Rab8 24. Qf3 Be5 25. Be3 Na6 26. Rc4 Nc5

Update 15:30 CET

Game 10 of the Caruana – Carlsen World Chess Championship 2018 match is here. After a record breaking streak of games, we are getting closer to a decisive result. For several games in a row Caruana had solid advantage. Yesterday, Carlsen was close to winning. Will we see the first decisive game of the match today?

Watch live video from TCEC_Chess_TV on www.twitch.tv

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Carlsen – Caruana 2018 game 9 LIVE!

Wed, 11/21/2018 - 16:36

Replay: Caruana – Carlsen game 1 / Carlsen – Caruana game 2 / Caruana – Carlsen game 3 / Carlsen – Caruana game 4 / Caruana – Carlsen game 5 / Carlsen – Caruana game 6 / Carlsen – Caruana game 7 / Caruana – Carlsen game 8

Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the 2018 World Chess Championship match between the reigning champion Magnus Carlsen (Norway) and the challenger Fabiano Caruana (USA). In this live blog + live games from WCC 2018 we will be covering the event Carlsen – Caruana with the latest news, developments, interviews, and in-game details.

The most important feature here will be the lines of analysis by Lc0 – the open Neural Network, and the TCEC champion Stockfish running on a Super Computer of 128 cores.

 

Refresh the page to get the latest updates

 

Current move eval: Move 59: Lc0 +0.00 , SF[128] +0.00

Update 19:30 CET

There goes the 9th draw of the World Chess Championship. Tomorrow is game 10 and Caruana will have white.
Update 18:30 CET

With precise play we are heading to draw 9 of the World Chess Championship

Update 17:30 CET

Opposite color bishops are now on the board, but with all heavy pieces present and slightly different pawn structures. Lc0 says chances are only present for white’s camp, black can only defend. It comes down to technique, with the speed of the last moves we can say both players are confident. At the same time, the last round of UT Dallas Open started, you can follow it live here

Update 16:45 CET

17… Bxf3 Caruana goes for direct resolution of the situation. Lc0 is not happy, neither is SF128. The top lines say:

Lc0 line 1, +1.21: 18. Bxf3 Nxd4 19. Bxd4 Qxd4 20. Qb3+ Kh8 21. e3 Qe5 22. Bxb7 Rab8 23. Bg2 Qg5 24. Qf7 Rf8 25. Qc4 Qc5 26. Qb3 g6 27. Rad1 Rbd8 28. Bf3 Qe7 29. Kg2 Kg7 30. h4 h5 31. Qc3 Qe5 32. Qc6 Qc5 33. Rd7+

Lc0 line 2, + 1.11: 18. Qb3+ Kh8 19. Bxf3 Nxd4 20. Bxd4 Qxd4 21. e3 Qe5 22. Bxb7 Rab8 23. Bc6 Bc5 24. Qa4 Red8 25. Rad1 g6 26. Bf3 Rxd1 27. Bxd1 Rb2 28. Bb3 Bxe3 29. Qc4 Kg7 30. Qf7+ Kh6

Update 17:15 CET

12. Bb2 is pointed as slight inaccuracy by SF128, dropping from +0.1 to +0.00. It now believes black has chances for advantage in some lines. Lc0′s neural network though says it is not so easy for black and still shows 0.00 eval.

Both engines point very different approaches for white.

Lc0: 12. .. Bb6 13. e3 Qe7 14. d4 Rad8 15. Qc2 Na5 16. Rfd1 c6 17. dxe5 Nc4 18. exf6 Qxf6 19. Rxd8 Rxd8 20. Re1 Qf5 21. e4 Qa5 22. Bc1 Na3 23. Bxa3 Qxa3 24. Ra1 h6 25. Bf1 Qc5 26. Rb1 Rf8 27. Nd4 Qe5 28. f4 Bxd4+ 29. cxd4 Qxd4+ 30. Kg2 b5 31. Rd1

SF128: 12. .. Bb6 13. d4 Bd5 14. e3 Na5 15. dxe5 fxe5 16. Qc2 c6 17. Nd2 Bxg2 18. Kxg2 Qd5+ 19. Ne4 h6 20. Rad1 Qe6 21. c4 Nxc4 22. Nf6+ gxf6 23. Qg6+ Kf8 24. Qxh6+ Kg8 25. Qg6+ Kf8

Update 17:11 CET

After move 11 the engines are not impressed and believe black has equalized:

Lc0 +0.01: 11. .. Be6 12. Qa4 Bb6 13. Rb1 Qd7 14. Rb2 Bh3 15. Bxh3 Qxh3 16. Qc4+ Kh8 17. Qe4 Qd7 18. Nh4 Bc5 19. Be3 Bxe3 20. fxe3 b6 21. Rf5 Ne7 22. Rh5 h6 23. Rb1 Rad8 24. Rf1 Qe6 25. c4 Kg8

SF128 -0.03: 11. .. Be6 12. Nd2 Qd7 13. Qa4 Rab8 14. Nb3 Bf8 15. Bxc6 Qxc6 16. Qxc6 bxc6 17. Be3 a5 18. Nxa5 Rb2 19. Rfe1 Ra8 20. Nxc6 Raxa2 21. Rxa2 Rxa2 22. f4 Ra6 23. Nb8 Ra8 24. Nc6

Update 17:09 CET

Here is the novelty by Magnus Carlsen 9. Bg5, a very rare move which is not seen above 2300 ELO level. Fabiano blasts his answer on the board Nxc3, showing he is not surprised and ready.

Lc0 +0.03: 10. .. Qd6 11. Bc1 Bf5 12. Nd2 Qd7 13. Qb3 Rab8 14. Qb5 Be7 15. a4 a6 16. Qd5 Bd6 17. Qb3 Bh3 18. a5 h6 19. Qa4 Bxg2 20. Kxg2 Bf8 21. Ba3

Update 17:01 CET

Once again we have the English opening at the board, where will the players deviate? So far we have the repeat of the rare …Bc5 , a battle of the seconds ahead.

Update 16:30 CET

It is time for game 9 of Carlsen – Caruana. So far eight draws are on the board, but the feeling is that many of those could have been decisive games. Carlsen was closest to victory in round 1, where a series of blunders equalized the game. Caruana has had more games with decisive chances. He finds the right path to advantage and fails to close it in the late middlegame or the endgame.

This match can go in any direction. 30 mins to the start of game 9, join us for the key lines of Lc0 and SF128.

Watch live video from TCEC_Chess_TV on www.twitch.tv

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Dvorkovich Implements The Power Vertical in FIDE

Wed, 11/21/2018 - 12:54

The 2018 4th quarter FIDE Presidential Board, and the first in mandate of new FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich, was held from 8-9th November at the Chelsea football club in London.

Highlights:
- FIDE budget increased by 150%
- Still no bank account
- A new super-body formed for day-to-day ruling
- Kirsan Ilyumzhinov’s people in this inner circle
- CAS case between Kirsan Ilyumzhinov and FIDE to be settled

Before the start of the session a new practice was introduced as the Presidential Board meeting was closed to the public. Even during the mandate of Kirsan Ilyumzhinov and Georgios Makropoulos all meetings were open.

Adding further to a new regime of secrecy, the Presidential Board muzzled any possible dissenting voices by insisting to “introduce and execute a non-disclosure agreements” on its members.

The list of all Presidential Board decisions is published on the FIDE website.

Arkady Dvorkovich (photo RIA Novosti / Arkady Natruskin)

A budget for 2019 of 5.546.000 EUR was presented and adopted with 3 million EUR allocated to development, 1,5 million grouped under the “General Secretariat” and 500.000 EUR for the Commissions. The budget is increased roughly by 150% compared to previous years. The bank account is still not re-opened in Switzerland.

The FIDE headquarters will be established in Lausanne. The budget for rent is consequently raised from 17.000 EUR (Athens office) to 150.000 EUR. Utilities and other office expenses also raised.

The budget for staff salaries jumped from 370.000 EUR to 600.000 EUR. 450.000 EUR will go towards the Reserve Fund

On the INCOME side, the Membership Fees and Registered Tournaments are cut down 50%. FIDE Title Application Fees are reduced by 40%. The budget is balanced by 4,5 million EUR of sponsorship.

A number of decisions delegated vast executive powers to the FIDE President.

In addition, a new super-body, the FIDE Management Board was established with the “key members of the FIDE executive as its members”:
▪ Arkady Dvorkovich as Chairman
▪ Igor Kogan, Russian billionaire and Dvorkovich’s 2018 Electoral Campaign Manager, as Deputy Chairman
▪ Zhu Chen, Treasurer
▪ Victor Bologan, Executive Director
▪ Emil Sutovsky, Director General
▪ Willy Iclicki, Chief Operating Officer
▪ Berik Balgabaev, Advisor to the FIDE President
▪ Mohamed Al-Mudahka, International Director
▪ Vadim Tsypin, Assistant to the FIDE President

The FIDE power is concentrated within this executive, with members from the former USSR, Israel and Qatar.

It is scandalous that the executive includes Berik Balgabaev and Willy Iclicki, originally members of Kirsan Ilyumzhinov team, who were involved in both the Glenn Stark case, which was effectively buried by the Russian propaganda machinery, and in initiating the bribery and consequent disgrace of the Serbian chess federation.

For Presidential advisers, at the moment only Berik Balgabaev has had funds of 96.000 EUR allocated to him.

Iclicki is appointed to oversee the Athens office until it is closed. His own appointed assistant is Sava Stoisavljevic, a close associate of Silvio Danailov and Vladimir Sakotic, who was suspended by the FIDE Ethics Commission for 6 months. In a sign of the moral meltdown here Stoisavljevic was actually suspended by the Ethics Panel in which Iclicki was member.

It appears that it takes as many as four people to do the work that was previously efficiently completed by just one – former Executive Director Nigel Freeman.

The attack on the standing of the FIDE Ethics Commission does not end there. An article published by the Russian Chess Federation effectively belittled the essential and hard work of the Commission over the last four year. This article conveniently omits the fact that CAS Lausanne, the world’s supreme sports court, upheld all the decisions of the FIDE Ethics Commission that were contested.

Also on the topic, the Presidential Board has decided to “settle the CAS case between Kirsan Ilyumzhinov and FIDE as soon as possible”.

Returning to the budget, an interesting provision of 50.000 EUR was projected for the expenses of “Re-audit for 2017-18″. Apparently, someone questioned the ill-mannered attempt to re-audit only the year when Georgios Makropoulos was the acting President, therefore the re-audit was extended for four years (not specified), and so the costs of this were raised as a consequence. Certainly, the most interesting item for this re-audit will be the mess of Kirsan Ilyumzhinov’s air-tickets, referred to FIDE by his Assistant Berik Balgabaev.

Finally, the decision No.20 is proposing to the General Assembly that all members of elected commissions (Constitutional, Ethics, Verification) “shall obtain endorsements from their national federations”. It is unclear why this pressure on the members of independent bodies is exerted. Even some members of the Presidential Board, such as Vice President Nigel Short, who was not elected by GA but appointed by Dvorkovich, are not endorsed by their national federations.

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Tata Steel Chess Tournament 2019

Tue, 11/20/2018 - 16:24

World champion Magnus Carlsen, who is currently defending his title in London, will once again participate in the Tata Steel Chess Tournament next January, the organisation announced today.

Five other players of the world’s top ten grandmasters will participate: Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (3), Ding Liren (4), Anish Giri (5), Vladimir Kramnik (7) and Viswanathan Anand (8).

The 81st edition of the Tata Steel Chess Tournament will take place from 11 – 27 January 2019. There will also be two Chess On Tour events. The Tata Steel Masters will play the 5th round in Theater de Vest in Alkmaar on Wednesday 16 January and will play the 10th round in the Pieterskerk in Leiden on Wednesday 23 January.

All rounds are open to the public free of charge and can also be followed online.

Participants Tata Steel Masters 2019:

GM Carlsen, Magnus NOR 2835
GM Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar AZE 2817
GM Ding, Liren CHN 2816
GM Giri, Anish NED 2780
GM Kramnik, Vladimir RUS 2777
GM Anand, Viswanathan IND 2773
GM Nepomniachtchi, Ian RUS 2763
GM Radjabov, Teimour AZE 2757
GM Duda, Jan-Krzysztof POL 2738
GM Shankland, Samuel USA 2724
GM Fedoseev, Vladimir RUS 2714
GM Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi IND 2702
GM Van Foreest, Jorden NED 2613

The 14th player will be announced in December. The participants of the Tata Steel Challengers will be announced at the same time.

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Caruana – Carlsen 2018 game 8 LIVE!

Mon, 11/19/2018 - 16:38

Replay: Caruana – Carlsen game 1 / Carlsen – Caruana game 2 / Caruana – Carlsen game 3 / Carlsen – Caruana game 4 / Caruana – Carlsen game 5 / Carlsen – Caruana game 6 / Carlsen – Caruana game 7

Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the 2018 World Chess Championship match between the reigning champion Magnus Carlsen (Norway) and the challenger Fabiano Caruana (USA). In this live blog + live games from WCC 2018 we will be covering the event Carlsen – Caruana with the latest news, developments, interviews, and in-game details.

The most important feature here will be the lines of analysis by Lc0 – the open Neural Network, and the TCEC champion Stockfish running on a Super Computer of 128 cores.

 

Refresh the page to get the latest updates

 

Current move eval: Move 33: Lc0 +0.9 , SF[128] +0.41

Update 19:35 CET

We come to the 8th draw of the match. Carlsen dodged a bullet, after Caruana missed 23. Rae1 and later blundered with 24. h3

Update 18:27 CET

And Caruana misses it! Total drama for the American player, goes 24. h3? and blunders

Lc0: 25. Nc4 Qg6 26. Nxd6 Qxd6 27. h4 gxh4 28. Qxf4 Qxf4 29. Rxf4 h5 30. Re1 Bg4 31. Rf6 Rxf6 32. Bxf6 b5 33. Re7 Rf8 34. Bxh4 Rf7 35. Re5 Rf5 36. Re8+ Rf8 37. Re7 Rf7 38. Re5 Rf5 39. Re8+ Rf8 40. Re4 Rf5 41. Re6 Rxd5 42. Rxa6 Rd1+ 43. Kh2 Rd2 44. Rg6+ Kf7 45. Rf6+ Ke8

SF128: 25. Nc4 Rd8 26. Rfe1 Qg6 27. Nxd6

Update 18:15 CET

23. Rad1 ?! for Caruana is ok, but much better was 23. Rae1. In the current position Qh5 is critical:

Lc0: 24. Qh5 Bg6 25. Qh3 Rf7 26. Rfe1 Bf5 27. Qh6 Bc2 28. Rd2 Bf8 29. Qh3 Bf5 30. Qh5 Bg6 31. Qd1 Bg7 32. d6 Qf8 33. Bxg7 Kxg7 34. Na4 Rf5 35. Re7+ Kh6 36. Nb6 Rd8 37. Nd7 Rxd7 38. Rxd7 f3 39. gxf3 Rxf3 40. Re7 c4 41. d7 Rd3 42. Re3 Qc5 43. Rxd3 cxd3

SF128: 24. Qh5 Bd3 25. h4 Be2 26. Kf2

The second possibility is Nc4 with 24. Nc4 g4 25. Qf2 f3 26. Rfe1 Rc8 27. gxf3 gxf3 28. Kh1 Bg6 29. Re6 Bf4 30. d6 Qg5 31. Ne5 Qg2+ 32. Qxg2 , but besides those Caruana has no other option on the plate.

Update 17:45 CET

20… Bf5 is acknowledgement for Carlsen that he has a bad position and needs active play, however, it is also a blunder increasing ever further Caruana’s advantage.

A critical line now 21. c5 Bf6 22. c6 Qc7 23. Rc1 Nxf3+ 24. Qxf3 Bxc3 25. Qxc3 Rf7 26. h3 Rbf8 27. Rce1 h5 28. Re2 Rg7 29. b4 Qd8 30. Kh1 Rc7 31. Kh2 Rg7 32. Qf3 Rh7 33. Ree1 Rff7 34. Qc3 Rhg7 35. Qd4 Rf8 36. Kg1 Rgf7 37. Re6 Rh7 38. Re2 Rg7 39. Rff2 Qc7

Update 17:38 CET

Close to 1 hour advantage on the clock for Caruana suggests that Carlsen is well aware of the difficult position he got himself in. Lc0 pointed the difficulty after move 18 to have a good move. Carlsen tried to be active with …g5 and the immediate reply of Caruana showed that the Norwegian has gone right into Caruana’s home preparation.

Update 17:30 CET

Stockfish running on 128 cores, the highest analysis ever made available for online games, suggests the following line with +1.4 eval

Update 17:18 CET

And Fabiano Caruana is spot on! With little hesitation he plays the critical line.

Update 17:15 CET

SF128: 20. Bc3 Qc7 21. b4 Bf6 22. Rc1 Bf5 23. Bxe5 Bxe5 24. Bg4 Bb2 25. Bxf5 Rxf5 26. Rc2 Bg7 27. Qd3 Rbf8 28. c5 dxc5 29. d6 Qc6 30. d7 Bd4+ 31. Kh1 R5f7 32. bxc5 Bf6 33. Qc4 Bd8 34. Rd2 Kg7 35. Rd6 Qb5 36. Qxb5 axb5 37. a6 bxa6 38. Nd5

Update 16:56 CET

And we have the first !boom of the game, Carlsen goes …g5 and engines do not like it at all. Lc0 is at +1,4 and SF 128 is at +0.52. Of course, Caruana has to find 19.c4 now, although g3 or Kh1 are also perfectly fine for keeping the advantage.

Lc0: 19. c4 Bf6 20. Bb4 f4 21. Be4 Ng4 22. Nxc8 Rxc8 23. Qxg4 Rxc4 24. Bxd6 Qxd6 25. Rae1 Kh8 26. Bf3 Qc5+ 27. Kh1 Qxa5 28. h3 Qc5 29. Kh2 Rb4 30. Rc1 Rc4 31. Rcd1 Qc8 32. Qh5 Qd7 33. Rfe1 Rd4 34. Rxd4 Bxd4 35. Qxg5 Qg7 36. Qe7 Bxb2 37. d6 Ba3 38. Bxb7 Bb4 39. Re6 Qg3+

SF 128: 19. c4 Bf6 20. Bc3 Qc7 21. Qc2 f4 22. Be2 Ng6 23. Bxf6 Rxf6 24. b4 Bf5 25. Qc3 Qg7 26. Rae1

Update 16:47 CET

Lc0 continues to the excited

Lc0 line 1 +0,5: 17. .. exf3 18. Bxf3 Bf6 19. c3 Bd7 20. Be2 Qe7 21. Qc2 Bg5 22. c4 f4 23. Nxd7 Qxd7 24. Kh1 Rbe8 25. Rf2 f3 26. Bxg5 Qg4 27. gxf3 Qxg5 28. Raf1 Qe3 29. f4 Rf6 30. f5 Ref8 31. b4 g6 32. Rg2 Qd4 33. Rgf2 Qe3 34. c5 Qd4 35. cxd6 Qxd5+ 36. Kg1 Qxd6 37. Qe4 gxf5 38. Qxb7

Lc0 line 2 +1.01 17. .. Nd7 18. Be3 Bf6 19. Nc4 b5 20. axb6 Nxb6 21. Na5 Qc7 22. Nc6 Ra8 23. c4 Nd7 24. Ra2 Bb7 25. Na5 Rab8

SF 128 keeps calm, but also grows to +0.41 with 17. .. exf3 18. Bxf3 f4 19. Be2 Bg5 20. Nxc8 Qxc8 21. Bc3 Qc5+ 22. Qd4 Qc7 23. Qb4 Rbe8 24. Rae1 g6 25. Bd1 f3 26. gxf3 Rf4 27. Qb3 Qd7 28. Kh1 Rh4 29. Bxe5 dxe5 30. Rg1 Bf4 31. Rg2 Rf8 32. c3 Qh3 33. Re4 Rh5 34. Qb6 Bxh2 35. Qe6+ Qxe6 36. dxe6 Bf4+ 37. Kg1 Re8 38. Rb4 Rh4 39. Rxb7 Rxe6

Update 16:25 CET

Lc0 starts to get impressed by the position of white, with the eval climbing to +0.52

Lc0: 14. .. e4 15. Nc4 Ne5 16. Nb6 Rb8 17. f4 exf3 18. Bxf3 Bf6 19. c3 Bd7 20. Be2 Qe7 21. Qc2 Bg5 22. Rf2 f4 23. Nxd7 Nxd7 24. Bg4 Ne5 25. Be6+ Kh8 26. Raf1 f3 27. gxf3 Bh4 28. Rg2 Nxf3+ 29. Kh1 Nxd2 30. Rxf8+ Rxf8 31. Qxd2 Rf1+ 32. Rg1 Qf6 33. Qe2

SF 128 is still at +0.21 and has different approach

SF 128 10. .. O-O 11. O-O Nd7 12. Bd2 a6 13. Na3 a5 14. f4 f5 15. c3 Bf6 16. fxe5 Nxe5 17. Kh1 g5 18. Nb5 f4 19. c4 b6 20. Bc3 Qe7 21. b4 axb4 22. Bxb4 Rd8 23. a5 Bg7 24. Bc3 bxa5 25. Rxa5 Ra6 26. Qc2 Rxa5 27. Bxa5 Re8 28. Bb4

Update 16:10 CET

SF 128 +0.22: 10. .. O-O 11. O-O Nd7 12. Bd2 a6 13. Na3 a5 14. f4 f5 15. c3 Bf6 16. fxe5 Nxe5 17. Kh1 g5 18. Nb5 f4 19. c4 b6 20. Bc3 Qe7 21. b4 axb4 22. Bxb4 Rd8 23. a5 Bg7 24. Bc3 bxa5 25. Rxa5 Ra6 26. Qc2 Rxa5 27. Bxa5 Re8 28. Bb4

Lc0 +0.31: 10. .. O-O 11. O-O Nd7 12. Bd2 a6 13. Na3 a5 14. Nb5 f5 15. f4 Bf6 16. Be3 exf4 17. Bxf4 Ne5 18. Kh1 g5 19. Bd2 Qe7 20. Qe1 Bd7 21. Bxa5 Ng6 22. Bb4 Be5 23. Nc7 Rac8 24. Ne6 Bxe6 25. dxe6 Qxe6 26. Qd2 g4 27. Rad1 Rf6 28. b3 Kg7 29. Bc4 Rxc4 30. bxc4 Qxc4 31. Rb1 f4 32. Qd3 Qc6 33. Bd2 Nh4 34. Rf2 g3 35. hxg3 fxg3 36. Re2

Update 16:03 CET

Now we are in the Sveshnikov variation 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 , they continue in the main line

Update 16:00 CET

The first move is 1.e4 by the guest of honor Demis Hassabis from Google Deep Mind’s Alpha Zero.

For everyone’s surprise it is Sicialian, but not Rossolimo, but the Open Sicilian 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4
Update 15:35 CET

Fabiano Caruana has the white pieces today. Will we see another theoretical battle in the Rossolimo variation? Or will Caruana try 1.d4 or 1.c4 to mix things up?

Update 15:30 CET

It is time for game 7 of the World Chess Championship 2018. After seven consecutive draws the audience is hungry for a win by any of the players. However, the stakes are high and it is less likely that players will take risks. A decisive result at any point from now on might very well mean the match is over.

Watch live video from TCEC_Chess_TV on www.twitch.tv

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Carlsen – Caruana 2018 game 7 LIVE!

Sun, 11/18/2018 - 16:21

Replay: Caruana – Carlsen game 1 / Carlsen – Caruana game 2 / Caruana – Carlsen game 3 / Carlsen – Caruana game 4 / Caruana – Carlsen game 5 / Carlsen – Caruana game 6

Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the 2018 World Chess Championship match between the reigning champion Magnus Carlsen (Norway) and the challenger Fabiano Caruana (USA). In this live blog + live games from WCC 2018 we will be covering the event Carlsen – Caruana with the latest news, developments, interviews, and in-game details.

The most important feature here will be the lines of analysis by Lc0 – the open Neural Network, and the TCEC champion Stockfish running on a Super Computer of 128 cores.

 

Refresh the page to get the latest updates

 

Current move eval: Move 39: Lc0 +0.00 , SF[128] +0.00

Update 19:30

After massive exchanges we reach the 7th draw of the match and 12th consecutive for Magnus Carlsen. Caruana has survived the two whites of Carlsen. The question now is can he use his white advantage tomorrow.

Update 18:00

Only one piece remains undeveloped in Caruana’s camp, the light squared bishop. Lc0 suggestion for development

15. .. Bd7 16. Bf4 Ng6 17. Bg3 Bc6 18. Nxc4 Bc7 19. Rac1 b5 20. Nd2 Bxg3 21. hxg3 Rac8 22. Qb3 Rfd8 23. Rfd1 a6 24. Qb4 Qxb4 25. axb4 Nd5 26. Na2 Nb6 27. Nc3 Nd5 28. Na2 Nb6 29. Nc3 Nd5

SF 128 prefers intermediate move

15. .. h6 16. Bh4 and then …Bd7 17. Bg3 Qc5 18. Bxe5 Qxe5 19. Nxc4 Qc7 20. b4 Rac8 21. Qb2 Rfd8 22. Rac1 a6 23. h3 Be8 24. Nxb6 Qxb6 25. Rc2 Rc7 26. Rfc1 Rdc8 27. Nb1 Qd6 28. Rxc7 Rxc7 29. Bf3 Bc6 30. Qd2 Qf8 31. Bxc6 Qc8 32. Rc3 Rxc6 33. Qc2 Rxc3 34. Qxc3 Qd8 35. Nd2 Nd5 36. Qc5 Nf6

Update 17:00

Both engines Lc0 and SF128 claim black has equalized. However, the position is not dry at all, and this is clearly seen by the early deviations in the possible lines:

Lc0 line 1: 13. .. dxc4 14. Nd2 Ne5 15. Nce4 Bd7 16. Qc3 Nxe4 17. Nxe4 f6 18. Qxe5 Bc6 19. Bxc4 Rae8 20. Bd3 Rd8 21. Bc4 Rde8 22. Bd3 Rd8 23. Bc4 Rde8

Lc0 line 2: 13. .. h6 14. Bh4 dxc4 15. Nd2 Ne5 16. O-O Bd7 17. Nce4 Bc6 18. Nxf6+ gxf6 19. Qc3 Bc7 20. Nxc4 Ng6 21. Bxf6 Qc5 22. Ne5 Qxc3

SF128 : 13. .. dxc4 14. Nd2 Ne5 15. O-O h6 16. Bh4 Bd7 17. Nce4 Ng6 18. Bxf6 gxf6 19. Qc3 Bd8 20. Ng3 f5 21. Nh5 e5 22. Nxc4 b5 23. Na5 Rc8 24. Qd2 Be6 25. Rac1 Rxc1 26. Rxc1 f4 27. Nc6 Qg5 28. g3 fxe3 29. Qxe3 Qxe3 30. fxe3 Bc7 31. e4 a6 32. Kg2

Lc0′s second line with 13…h6 is perfectly fine to resolve the immediate threat. The question is how deep Caruana’s preparation in this position goes.

Update 16:45

Now Carlsen has lot’s of moves to choose from: Bg3, Rd1, Bg5, O-O, h3, Na4, h4, all of them valid for white. Black’s main reply to all of them is dxc4

Update 16:35

Carlsen goes for the second line of Lc0, a one that can lead to more complications along the way. Caruana’s reaction here will be important

Update 16:30

Lc0 recommends two approaches, each with eval +0.23 here. One is 12. Rd1, the other 12. Be2

Lc0 line 1: 12. Rd1 Qe7 13. Be2 dxc4 14. Bxc4 Bc7 15. Bxc7 Qxc7 16. Nb5 Qb6 17. Be2 a6 18. Nd6 Nd5 19. Rc1 Rd8 20. Nc4 Qc7 21. O-O Bd7 22. Nca5 Qb6 23. Nxc6 Bxc6 24. Nd4 Rac8 25. b4 h6 26. Bf3 Bd7 27. Qb2 a5 28. Bxd5 exd5 29. h3 Rc4 30. Rb1 axb4

Lc0 line 2: 12. Be2 dxc4 13. Bxc4 Bd7 14. Rd1 Ne7 15. Qe2 Rc8 16. O-O a6 17. Nd2 Ned5 18. Be5 Bc7 19. Bd4 Bc6 20. Nxd5 Nxd5 21. Nf3 Qe7 22. Ne5 Bxe5 23. Bxe5 Qg5 24. f4 Qg6

Update 16:10 CET

Magnus Carlsen deviates, instead of 10. Rd1 (the main line) now he deviates 10. Nd2. Caruana goes for immediate Qd8

Lc0 +0.50: 11. Nf3 Qa5 12. Rd1 Be7 13. Be2 Ne4 14. cxd5 Nxc3 15. bxc3 exd5 16. O-O Bf6 17. c4 Be6 18. Bg5 dxc4 19. Bxf6 gxf6 20. Bxc4 Qc5 21. Rc1 Qxa3 22. Qe4 Qe7 23. Bb5 a5 24. Bxc6 bxc6 25. Nd4 a4

SF128 +0.33: 11. Nf3 Qa5 12. Rd1 Be7 13. Be2 Ne4 14. cxd5 Nxc3 15. bxc3 exd5 16. O-O h6 17. a4 Rd8 18. Rb1 Bd6 19. Bxd6 Rxd6 20. Rfc1 Rb8 21. h3 Qc7 22. Bd3 Qe7 23. Nd4 Bd7 24. Qa2 Ne5 25. Bf1 Nc6 26. a5 Nxd4 27. cxd4 Bf5 28. Rb5 Be4 29. Rbc5 Rc6 30. a6 Rxc5 31. Rxc5 bxa6 32. Qxa6 Rb6 33. Qa1 Rb8

Update 16:03 CET

The game is on, following game 2 opening 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 e6 4. Nc3 Be7 * , replay the key moments of game 2 here

Update 15:30 CET

Game 6 of the World Chess Championship was Carlsen’s 11th consecutive draw. Besides the 6 games at the WCC, he also drew his last five games of the European Club Cup. In quite a few of these games, Carlsen was against the ropes.

In this World Championship match he is not in a must-win situation. Six more consecutive draws will lead him to a tiebreak, where he has proven superior in faster time controls. Caruana, on the other hand, is gaining confidence with every game and may already be hungry for a win.

Update 15:15 CET

Caruana is cruising safely so far with the black pieces thanks to solid home preparation. If Carlsen wants to take this match, he might need to go for slightly riskier openings. The early queen exchange that looked like fireworks was really just a few moves excitement that allows black to equalize early on.

Will we see 1. d4 today or another repeat of a theoretical battle?

Update 15:00 CET

One hour is left to the start of game 7 of the World Chess Championship match between Fabiano Caruana and Magnus Carlsen. This is the first game after the halftime of the match. With the score equal 3-3 Magnus Carlsen will have the white pieces for a second consecutive game.

Watch live video from TCEC_Chess_TV on www.twitch.tv

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Carlsen – Caruana 2018 game 6 LIVE!

Fri, 11/16/2018 - 16:32

Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the 2018 World Chess Championship match between the reigning champion Magnus Carlsen (Norway) and the challenger Fabiano Caruana (USA). In this live blog + live games from WCC 2018 we will be covering the event Carlsen – Caruana with the latest news, developments, interviews, and in-game details.

The most important feature here will be the lines of analysis by Lc0 – the open Neural Network, and the TCEC champion Stockfish running on a Super Computer of 128 cores.

 

Refresh the page to get the latest updates

 

Current move eval: Move 80: Lc0 0.00 , SF[128] 0.00

Update 22:31

A draw agreed. Caruana played a fantastic game, with computer precision. Carlsen has a lot to think about, not being able to take advantage with white for several games is not a good sign for him. Caruana on the other hand should be very happy with his performance, despite the missed opportunities.

Update 22:15

Another bullet dogged by Carlsen, at move 68 it was a mate. A computer one, but still a mate. 68. Bc4 Bh4 69. Bd5 Ne2 70. Bf3 Ng1 71. Bg4 Kg8 72. Kh6 Bg3 73. Kg6 Be5 74. Kh6 Bf4+ 75. Kg6 Bg5 76. h6 Kh8 77. h7 Bh4 78. Kh6 Be1 79. Kg6 Bc3 80. Kh6 Bd2+ 81. Kg6 Bg5 82. Bh5 Nh3 83. Bg4 Nf4+ 84. Kf7 Kxh7 85. Bd1 Kh6 86. Kf8 Nd5 87. Kg8 Ne7+ 88. Kh8 Nxf5 89. Kg8 Ne3 90. Kf7 Nxd1 91. Ke6 f5 92. Kd5 f4 93. Kc4 f3 94. Kb3 f2 95. Ka2 f1=Q 96. Ka1 Qe2 97. Kb1 Qb2#

Update 20:45

SF Dev -1.03 51. b4 Bxb4 52. Kf3 Na4 53. Ke3 Ba3 54. Bb3 Nc5 55. Bd1 Ke7 56. Kd4 Kd6 57. h5 Nd7 58. Be2 Bb2+ 59. Kd3 Bc1 60. g6 Ba3 61. Kc2 Ke7 62. Bb5 Nf6 63. Be2 Bb4 64. a4 Be1 65. Bc4 Nxh5 66. gxf7 Nf6

Lc0 -2.8 51. b4 Bxb4 52. Kf3 f6 53. Ke3 Bc5+ 54. Kf4 Ke7 55. Kg4 Bf2 56. Bb3 Nb5 57. a4 Nd4 58. Bd5 Be1 59. Be4 Nb3 60. Bc6 Nc5 61. Bb5 Nb7 62. Bc4 Nd6 63. Be6 Ne4 64. Bc4 Nc5 65. Bb5 Kf7 66. Kh5 Bd2 67. Kg4 Ne4 68. Bc6 Nd6 69. Bd5+ Ke7

Update 20:30

The real drama kicks in now! Carlsen sacrifices a piece, blasting Lc0 to -2.8. Deep analysis by SF128 is still at -0.18, showing a draw.

Lc0: 48. g4 Ba3 49. g5 Nc3 50. Bc4 Kf8 51. b4 Bxb4 52. Kf3 f6 53. Ke3 Ke7 54. g6 Bc5+ 55. Kd3 Nd1 56. Ke4 Nc3+ 57. Kd3 Nd1 58. Ke4 Ba3 59. h5 Bc1 60. Bb3 Nc3+ 61. Kd3 Nb5 62. a4 Nc7 63. Bc4 Kd6 64. Kd4 Kc6 65. Bd3 Kb6 66. a5+ Kxa5 67. Kc5 Bh6 68. Kc6 Na6 69. Bxa6 Kxa6 70. Kd7 Kb5 71. Ke7 Kc5 72. Ke6

Update 19:30

Just before the time control at move 39, the engines have their clear verdict. SF128 shows -0.5, indicating permanent advantage for black. Lc0 now goes above -1.00 showing that it is not only advantage, but an easier position to play in.

SF128: 39. .. Nxa2 40. Bxh5 Bb2 41. Ba7 Nc3 42. Bb6 Nb5 43. Nc2 Nd6 44. Ne3 Nc8 45. Bc7 Bxd4 46. Bf3 Ne7 47. g4 Bf6 48. Ng2 b5 49. h5 d4 50. Nf4 Kh7 51. Kg2 Bg5 52. Nd3 Nd5 53. Bb6 Ne3+ 54. Kf2 Bxf3 55. Kxf3 Nf1 56. b4 Be3 57. Ke4 Nh2 58. Bxd4 Bxd4 59. Kxd4 Nxg4 60. Nc5 Kh6 61. Nxa6 Kxh5 62. Nc7 Nh6 63. f6
Eval

Lc0: 39. .. Bb2 40. Ba7 Nxa2 41. Bxh5 Nc3 42. Bb6 Nb5 43. Nc2 Nd6 44. Kf3 Bd7 45. Bg4 Bxf5 46. Bxf5 Nxf5 47. Kf4 g6 48. h5 Bc1+ 49. Ke5 Nxg3 50. hxg6 fxg6 51. Ne1 Kf7 52. Kxd5 Ne2 53. Kd6 Bf4+ 54. Kd7 Nc1 55. d5 Nxb3 56. Nd3 Bg5 57. Ne5+ Kf6 58. Nc4 Nd2 59. Bd8+ Kf5 60. Nd6+ Kf4 61. Bxg5+ Kxg5 62. Nxb7 Nc4 63. Kc6 Kf4 64. d6 Nxd6 65. Nxd6 g5 66. Kd5 g4 67. Ne4 a5 68. Kd4 a4

Besides the risky retreat giving up space advantage, Carlsen’s 38. f5 seems to be inaccuracy handing the advantage to black.

Update 18:45

After 30. b3, the passive play of Carlsen starts to show minor advantages for black

SF128: -0.25 30. .. Na3 31. Rxc8 Rxc8 32. Rc1 Rxc1 33. Bxc1 Nb5 34. Nf4 Nc3 35. Bc2 Nxa2 36. Bb2 Bd2 37. Nxh5 Nb4 38. Ke2 Bh6 39. Bb1 f5 40. Ba3 Nc6 41. Kd3 Bf7 42. Nf4 Bxf4 43. gxf4 Be6 44. Kc3 Kf7 45. Bc2 Bd7 46. Bd6 a6 47. Bd3 Kf6 48. Bc2 Kg6 49. Bf8 Kh7 50. Bd6 Bc8 51. Bf8 Kh6 52. Bd3 Bd7 53. Bb1 Kh7 54. Bc2 Kg6 55. Bd3 Be6 56. Bc2 b5 57. Bd3 Bd7 58. h5+ Kf6 59. b4

Lc0: -0.6 30. .. Na3 31. Bg5 Re8 32. Rxc8 Rxc8 33. Be3 a5 34. Nf4 Nb5 35. Nxh5 Nc3 36. Bc2 Ba3 37. Nf4 Bb2 38. Re1 Nxa2 39. Bb1 Nb4 40. Re2 Bc3 41. Nxe6 fxe6 42. Kg2 b5 43. h5 Ra8 44. Bc1 Nc6 45. Rxe6 Nxd4 46. Rd6 Nxb3 47. Be3 a4 48. Rxd5 b4 49. g4 Kh8 50. Rd7 a3 51. Be4 Rb8 52. Ra7 Nd2 53. Bd5 b3 54. Rxa3 b2 55. Ba2

Update 18:00

Strange play by Carlsen. After retreating the bishop to c2, now the knight goes to g2. This gives all initiative to black

Update 17:03

Equal material and symmetric position, difficult time for commentators to find excitement in this. Carlsen seems in no hurry to score a full point, Caruana is also happy with the equality in the match so far.

Update 16:55

Carlsen goes for 15. d3, and Caruana quickly replies 15… d5. Both are still developing their pieces and stabilizing the position, after the early queen exchange. SF128 stays at around +0.2 evaluation, Lc0 also suggests ease of play for for sides with +0.15

Update 16:30

Probably not the best 14th move by Caruana, the evaluation of SF128 is +0.33, although the continuation is still drawish after 15. Kf2 a5 16. h4 d5 17. Nc2 a4 18. Bd3 Bd6 19. Re1 g6 20. Rb1 Kd8

Full SF128 line 15. Kf2 a5 16. h4 d5 17. Nc2 a4 18. Bd3 Bd6 19. Re1 g6 20. Rb1 Kd8 21. Ne2 Bd7 22. b3 Re8 23. Bh6 c5 24. dxc5 Nxc5 25. Nb4 axb3 26. axb3 Ra2 27. Be3 Nxd3+ 28. Nxd3 Kc7 29. Rb2 Rxb2 30. Nxb2 Nc8 31. Nd3 Ne7 32. Bf4 Bb5 33. Bxd6+ Kxd6 34. Ne5 Kxe5 35. Nd4+ Kf6 36. Nxb5 Rd8 37. g3 Nf5

Lc0 suggests 15. h4 h5 16. Nc4 Nxc4 17. Bxc4 d5 18. Bd3 Bd6 19. g3 Kf8 20. Kf2 g6 21. Nxe6+ Bxe6 22. Bf4 Ke7 23. Bxd6+ Kxd6 24. Ke3 a5 25. Kf4 b6 26. a3 c5 27. Rhe1 c4 28. Bc2 b5 29. Kg5 f6+ 30. Kf4 Rag8 31. Ke3 g5 32. Kf2 Rg7 33. Rh1 g4 with eval +0.16

Update 16:10

Carlsen plays the line by Lc0 and queens are exchanged. The speed at which they are playing suggests this is all preparation.

Update 16:05

6… Nc6 is novelty at top level chess for humans. An early one! Interesting line here is suggested by Lc0 7. Nd5 Nd4 8. Nxe7 Nxe2 9. Nd5 Nd4 10. Na3 Ne6 11. f3 N4c5 12. d4 Nd7

Full Lc0 line: 7. Nd5 Nd4 8. Nxe7 Nxe2 9. Nd5 Nd4 10. Na3 Ne6 11. f3 N4c5 12. d4 Nd7 13. c3 c6 14. Nf4 Nb6 15. Kf2 Nxf4 16. Bxf4 Be6 17. c4 g6 18. b3 Bg7 19. Nc2 Bf5 20. Ne3 Bxd4 21. Rd1 Bc5 22. g4 Be6 23. Bxd6 Nd7 24. Bxc5 Nxc5 25. Bd3 Nxd3+ 26. Rxd3 Rd8 27. Rxd8+ Kxd8 28. Ng2 h5 29. Nf4 Bd7 30. g5 Re8 31. h4 Bf5 32. Ne2 Kc7 33. Rd1 a5 34. Nc3

Update 16:03

Today we have Petroff on the board, the main weapon of Fabiano Caruana. They played the same opening this summer at the Sinquefield Cup, replay the game here. A long positional fight ahead

Update 15:30

So far with Carlsen on the white side we saw English, Four Knights, Kingside Fianchetto in game 2 and Queen’s Gambit Declined in game 4. Carlsen always downplays his opening preparation. The fact is he is extremely well prepared and will look today for an opening advantage early on.

Update 15:00

Welcome to the live coverage of the Carlsen – Caruana match. Five draws so far, but all is going to change soon. The day of the two consecutive white’s has come. As per the rules, whoever started the match with black will have two consecutive whites in games 5 and 6 and will finish the match with black too. Carlsen’s team certainly have prepared for this a sharper, more interesting and more surprising line. Is Caruana ready to counter the home preparation of Carlsen? So far the American has been extremely solid with the black pieces, one would say he is more comfortable than playing white.

More: Caruana – Carlsen game 1 / Carlsen – Caruana game 2 / Caruana – Carlsen game 3 / Carlsen – Caruana game 4 / Caruana – Carlsen game 5

Watch live video from TCEC_Chess_TV on www.twitch.tv

Categories: Ενημέρωση

UTD Fall FIDE Open 2018 LIVE!

Fri, 11/16/2018 - 06:40

The UTD Fall FIDE Open 2018 is going to take place November 16 – 21. A total of 36 players from 14 countries will participate. Top seeded are GM Anton Kovalyov, GM Timur Gareyev, GM Li Ruifeng, GM Razvan Preotu, GM Ori Kobo, GM Gil Popilski, GM Danny Raznikov, etc.

The event will be a round robin of 9 rounds, with time control 90 min. +30 seconds increment from move 1

Live games with analysis daily on Chessdom.com with the TCEC champions Stockfish, Komodo, and Houdini.

Official website of the tournament

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Caruana – Carlsen 2018 game 5 LIVE!

Thu, 11/15/2018 - 16:05

Hello everyone and welcome to the live coverage of the 2018 World Chess Championship match between the reigning champion Magnus Carlsen (Norway) and the challenger Fabiano Caruana (USA). In this live blog + live games from WCC 2018 we will be covering the event Carlsen – Caruana with the latest news, developments, interviews, and in-game details.

The most important feature here will be the lines of analysis by Lc0 – the open Neural Network, and the TCEC champion Stockfish running on a Super Computer of 128 cores.

 

Refresh the page to get the latest updates

 

Current move eval: Move 33: Lc0 0.00 , SF[128] 0.00

Update 19:00 CET

As expected, a handshake comes on move 33. An interesting opening by Caruana that was a surprise, but certainly did not lead to any advantage. The next two games Carlsen will have the white pieces.

Update 18:30 CET

Precise play by both players, we are heading to a forced line that can bring another draw around move 30 or 35.

Update 16:55 CET

Slight inaccuracy by Caruana! He blasted 17. c3 on the board, but engines suggest 0.3 to 0.4 eval drop

SF 128 -0.1 17. .. Kd7 18. cxb4 Ra8 19. Bc3 Kxc7 20. Ng5 Bf8 21. Nxe6+ fxe6 22. b5 Nd4 23. d3 Bc5 24. Nd2 Ra2 25. Kf1 Rc2 26. Bxd4 Bxd4 27. Re2 Rb2 28. Nf3 Rb1+ 29. Re1 Rxb5 30. Ng5 Kd6 31. Nxh7 Rb2 32. Re2 Rb1+ 33. Re1 Rxe1+ 34. Kxe1 b5 35. Ng5 b4 36. Kd1

Lc0 -0.47 17. .. Kd7 18. cxb4 Ra8 19. Bc3 Kxc7 20. Ng5 Bf8 21. Nxe6+ fxe6 22. Rc1 Kb6 23. Kf1 Bxb4 24. Ke2 Bc5 25. Bb2 Nd4+ 26. Kd1 g5 27. d3 Ra2 28. Nd2 Nc6 29. Nc4+ Kb5 30. Ra1 Rxa1+ 31. Bxa1 Bxf2 32. Nd6+ Kb4 33. Nxb7 Bd4 34. Bxd4 exd4 35. Kd2 g4 36. Nd6 Ne5 37. Ne8 Nd7 38. Ng7 e5 39. Nf5 Kb3

Note that the second best move is a mistake leading to +1.1 after a capture on 17. .. bxc3 and then 18. Nxc3 Kd7 19. Nd5 Kd6 20. Rb1 Bxd5 21. exd5 Kxd5 22. Rxb7 Rc8 23. Ng5 f6 24. Nxh7 Ke6 25. f4 exf4 26. Ng5+

Update 16:45 CET

15. Qc7 Qxc7 is the only option for white as 15. Qd3 Nc6 16. Bb2 O-O 17. c3 Qa2 18. Qc2 Rc8 19. d3 Nd4 20. Nxd4 exd4 21. c4 b5 22. c5 b3 23. Qc1 Be5 24. Na3 Bxd6 25. Bxd4 Bxc5 26. Bxc5 b2 27. Qc3 Qb3 would mean -1.12 according to Lc0 eval

A line by the 128 cores Stockfish super computer

15. Qc7 Qxc7 16. dxc7 Nc6 17. Rd1 Kd7 18. d4 b3 19. Nxe5+ Kxc7 20. cxb3 Ra8 21. Nd2 Nxe5 22. dxe5 Bh6 23. Bd4 b5 24. g3 Bxd2 25. Rxd2 Bxb3 26. Rb2 Bd1 27. Rxb5 Bf3 28. Kf1 Ra3 29. Rc5+ Kd8 30. Rc6 Ke8 31. Rd6 Rd3 32. Be3 Rxd6 33. exd6 Bxe4 34. Bc5 Kd7 35. Ke2 Ke6 36. Ke3 Bc6 37. Kd4 g5 38. f4 g4 39. Bb4 f5 40. Kc4 h5 41. Ba3 Bf3

Update 16:32 CET

First moment when Carlsen takes time to think. The speed at which they were moving so far suggest that they are in preparation. The line is indeed sharp, but looking at the top lines of Lc0 things can quickly converge to a draw.

Lc0: 13. .. Qa5 14. cxd6 Be6 15. Qc7 Qxc7 16. dxc7 Nc6 17. Rd1 Kd7 18. d4 Ba2 19. d5 Nd4 20. Nxd4 exd4 21. Nd2 Rc8 22. Nf3 Rxc7 23. Bxd4 Bf8 24. Ne1 Rc4 25. Kf1 b3 26. cxb3 Bxb3 27. Rb1 Rb4 28. Kg1 Rxd4 29. Rxb3 Rxe4 30. Rxb7+ Kd6 31. Kf1 Be7 32. Nd3 Kxd5 33. g3 Ke6 34. Nf4+ Kd6 35. Kg2 Re5 36. h4 Rf5 37. Nh3 h6 38. Ra7 Bd8 39. Ra3 Ra5 40. Rb3

Update 16:26 CET

Polschikov-Anoshkin 2007 0-1 last game in book after 10 …d6 11.bxc5

Update 16:15 CET

The main question now, is 6. b4 a direct draw offer in the opening, or Caruana has something cooked?

Update 16:03 CET

1. e4 c5, Sicilian, but there comes the bombastic move by Caruana, after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. Re1 e5 he plays 6. b4!?

Lc0 says take with the pawn 6. .. Nxb4 7. Bb2 Nc6 8. Bxc6 dxc6 9. Nxe5 Nf6 10. Nf3 O-O 11. a4 Re8 12. d3 c4 13. h3 cxd3 14. cxd3 b6 15. Qc2 c5 16. Na3 Nh5 17. Bxg7 Nxg7 18. Rad1 Ne6 19. d4 Ng5 20. Nxg5 Qxg5 21. d5 Bxh3 22. f3 Bd7 23. Nc4 Qf4 24. e5 Bf5 +0.28

SF128 says take with the knight 6. .. Nxb4 7. Bb2 +0.18

In any case a rare move that does not lead to direct advantage, rather to a surprise at the opening.

Update 15:45 CET

Today is an eventful day in the world of chess. Besides the game Caruana – Carlsen, we have the semi finals of the Women World Championship, an interesting interview with GM Alexander Morozevich, and the end of the first round robin of Div 4 of the Top Chess Engine Championship

Update 15:15 CET

There is always the possibility that Caruana tries something different with 1. d4 for example, as this is his last game with white before having twice in a row the black pieces, starting tomorrow. A third option of course is to enter in a theoretical dispute in the English opening that Carlsen employed the other day. To learn more about the English opening see GM Boris Avrikh on Caruana’s approach to 1. c5 e5 here

Update 15:00 CET

Game 5 start in about 1 hour. In the previous two games where Caruana had white we saw Sicilian Rossolimo. Game 1 saw 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. d3 Bg7 6. h3 Nf6 7. Nc3 Nd7 8. Be3 e5 and then 9. O-O. Here Lc0′s suggestion was 9. Qd2 and SF128 suggestion was 9. Qc1. In game 3 they deviated earlier as Caruana went 6. O-O instead of 6. h3.

More: Caruana – Carlsen game 1 / Carlsen – Caruana game 2 / Caruana – Carlsen game 3 / Carlsen – Caruana game 4

Watch live video from TCEC_Chess_TV on www.twitch.tv

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Interview with Alexander Morozevich

Thu, 11/15/2018 - 12:54

It is not the first time for one of the strongest chess players of his generation to work as a commentator at a major event, and he always approaches this job creatively. Here is the interview by the official website of the Women World Championship with GM Alexander Morozevich.

More: Live games / Quarterfinal tiebreaks

– How do you find the World Women’s Championship in Khanty-Mansiysk?

– Quite bleak. November is a fairly cold month in Khanty-Mansiysk. One has to be very careful about the clothing and amount of time spent outside. This is especially important for such a heat-loving plants as yours truly. Some of the participants from the warmer countries are probably uncomfortable here, too. Like it or not, but it brings certain restraints and influences the results.

– Do you like the format of the tournament? Considering this is the last knock-our World Championship…

– This format is exceptionally hard for the participants, however, one cannot invent anything more exciting and attractive for the fans. In my opinion, a knock-out cannot be boring. There is a lot of fight with many decisive games, lack of short draws, and something exciting happens in every round.

The only thing that depresses me is a very small number of spectators. Apart from several officials, fathers, mothers, and other team members, there are very few onlookers. And we are not talking about some open – this is a World Championship! I got used to having no live feedback from my English streams, and this is understandable – all the viewers are on the net. However, I’d like to see more interaction with the Russian commentators.

– Do you have any suggestions?

– I don’t, but I am not an organizer. It is obvious, however, that FIDE needs to do something about it. In my opinion, women’s chess can and must draw more interest than men’s chess. I don’t think the London match between Carlsen and Caruana succeeded in creating much hype, either.

– What would you like to see at the chess events?

– Generally I want to bring excitement back to chess. People must enjoy coming to tournaments. Tournaments can be a good fun, training, or basis for communication, a social circuit of sorts. There is a number of ways to deal with it.

– Back to our tournament – was there anything that surprised you?

– To be honest, I had stopped following women’s chess for quite a while, and wouldn’t know much about the favorites before the championship. As the tournament went on, I caught up with the situation. The games, like in any other women’s tournament, are nerve-wrecking and inconsistent. The same player can play both excellently and horribly.

– A few words about the balance of power.

– The upper part of the table seems stronger than the lower part. The latter has an unquestionable favorite – Kateryna Lagno. She plays much better than anyone else; she is possibly in a good form. I will be surprised not to see her in the final. The situation in the upper part is not as obvious. There is Ju Wenun, Kosteniuk, Anna Muzychuk – each of these players deserves to be in the final.

– Have you discovered any new names?

– Yes, there are some. Judging by purely chess content, I can note the Iranian Mobina Alinasab, who was virtually unknown before the tournament. I liked the girl from Uzbekistan, Gulrukhbegim Tokhirjonova – although it seems everyone else already knew and respected her. I think she has very high potential; she plays solid and powerful chess. It is necessary to mention Zhansaya Abdumalik, whose achievements had reached even my ears. She can achieve a lot in women’s chess, however, if one doesn’t have 2600 by the age of 19, the prospects in men’s chess are nebulous.

– It sounds a little harsh…

– No, I really liked some of her games. For instance, in the middlegame of the first Quarterfinal game against Mariya Muzychuk she played series of moves that a strong grandmaster could be proud of. However, as if often happens with girls, her play is inconsistent. I wish her to keep improving!

– Do you think the champion can defend her title? It seems she almost meets no resistance…

– That’s it – they aren’t even trying to fight her. Ju Wenjun plays the way she likes, obtains positions she enjoys, she always feels at home. I think she understands very well which strategy can bring her success. This is why her victories look so easy.

– Who can stop her and how?

– I am not sure about who, but I more or less know how. One must play hard against her, take risks, move forward, use bluff…

– You are saying that women’s chess is more attractive than men’s chess. Do you enjoy commenting women’s games?

– As I said, this is a strange job. You have to talk to yourself for five hours straight every day. Perhaps I’ll need a therapist after the championship. I am greatly missing feedback of any sort. Very few spectators come up with questions. I tried to ask them several times, but my own echo was the only response.

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Caruana’s approach to 1.c4 e5 Explained in an Opening Database by GM Boris Avrukh

Wed, 11/14/2018 - 19:53

Every chess player has faced the dilemma of how to meet the English opening. Caruana had to face it himself at the World Chess Championship and  GM Boris Avrukh has provided a detailed explanation at Modern Chess opening database here

1.c4 is objectively a weaker move than 1.e4 or 1.d4, but it is by far the trickiest option for White on move 1. With so many transpositions, different setups and move orders, White has plenty of options to turn the game into the desired setup.

That’s why we are pleased to announce this database in which one of the top theoreticians in the world – GM Boris Avrukh, provides you with a complete, aggressive repertoire against 1.c4.

Black has many choices after 1.c4, but the Reversed Sicilian (1…e5) is by far the most principled move.

Hence it is no surprise that GM Avrukh decided to base his repertoire on it.

White has two main branches here: to play 2.g3, or 2.Nc3 3.g3 or to play 2.Nc3 followed by 3.Nf3.

In this database, GM Avrukh deals with the second option.

The main position arises after 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 Nc6, the so-called “Four Knights Variation of the English Opening”

In this position, White tried almost everything.

Boris analyzes 4.g3, 4.e3, 4.d3, 4.d4, 4.a3, 4.d4 in detail.

Theoretical Section

Chapter 1

The first chapter is about the move 4.a3.

This move looks dubious, but it not so easy to deal with it.

For example, Kramnik, Topalov, and Ivanchuk have used it with success.

The main line here starts after 4…d5, but Boris was not impressed with this variation and suggested continuing with the second most popular move – 4…g6.

This is the only variation where he recommends to fianchetto the bishop. It makes perfect sense here because White’s 4.a3 looks like a waste of time if the bishop is on g7.

White has two main setups here: 5.e3 or 5.g3, but we meet them in a similar way. Just Bg7, 0-0 and d7-d5 with an excellent play in both cases.

Chapter 2

This chapter deals with 4.d3.

This is not the most challenging line but there is some logic to it.

White wants to play Sicilian with a tempo up.

Black should accept the challenge here and play 4…d5!

The main line arises after the moves 5.cxd5 Nxd5 6.e3 Be7 7.Be2 0-0 8.0-0 Be6.

So, both sides achieved their outcomes. White reached his desired setup and Black developed his pieces actively and has an advantage in the center.

Boris analyzed this Scheveningen setup in depth and proved that Black has at least equal play.

Chapter 3

In this Chapter, GM Avrukh covers the move 4.e4.

This is a very tricky move after which White’s set-up resembles the Botvinnik variation with the c4 and e4 pawns.

Black should answer this in the most principled way. 4…Bc5 and now White continues with 5.Nxe5 (otherwise Black is simply better, because of the hole on d4) 5…Nxe5 6.d4 Bb4! 7.dxe5 Nxe4

The theory starts here. Boris analyzed 5 different moves.

The main line continues 8.Qd4 Nxc3 9.bxc3 Be7 10.Qg4 and here Boris suggests 10…Kf8 instead of the main move 10…g6.

Boris analyzed this position very deeply and proves that Black’s position is perfectly playable, and White should be careful to maintain the balance.

Chapter 4

In this Chapter, you will learn what to do against 4.d4.

This continuation is quite tricky even though it is not that popular at the very high level.

In this line, Boris reveals some of his novelties and opted for some rare continuations.

For example, in the main line 4…cxd4 5.Nxd4 Bb4 6.Bg5, the author suggests the extremely rare 6…d5!

The chapter is full of new ideas and novelties and Boris proves very convincingly that Black’s position is quite promising.

Chapter 5 and 6 

In this and next chapter

GM Avrukh deals with the most serious sideline 4.e3.

This move became very popular nowadays. With a lot of games on top level, it is hard to call it a sideline. It is just a serious alternative to the 4.g3 move.

After 4.e3, the best move for Black is, of course, 4…Bb4!. In this chapter Boris analyses 5.Nd5 and 5.d4

If after 5.d4 Black is equalizing easily by exchanging and playing 0-0 followed by d5, after 5.Nd5, the game becomes really complex.

Black should accept the challenge and play 5…e4 when White has two equally good continuations 6.Nxb4 and 6.Ng1. As you will see in the analyses both moves have their pros and cons, but the evaluations of the arising positions do not change – Black has adequate counterplay in very complex positions where both sides can play for a win. Boris thoroughly explains the ideas for both sides and armed with this knowledge you can play these positions with confidence.

Chapter 6

In this chapter, you will find the main line after 4.e3 Bb4 – the move 5.Qc2

Now, 5…e4 is not possible and 6.Nd5 becomes a serious threat.

Even though that in most of the games Black allows that and continues with 5…0-0, Boris didn’t like the position after 6.Nd5. Thus he suggests playing the radical 5…Bxc3.

It looks strange to give up your pair of bishops even without waiting for Nd5 or a3, but this move has a logical explanation. With his fifth move, White loses some time and needs a few more moves to finish the development. In the meantime, Black pushes d5 and tries to create some threats whilst White still needs time to finish the development.  The main line goes 6.Qxc3 Qe7 7.a3 d5! 8.d4. Here Black should continue with 8…cxd4 9.Nxd4 Nxd4 10.Qxd4 c5

with enough counterplay for Black.

In Chapters 7-10, the author deals with the main line which arises after 4.g3.

Black has various choices like 4…Bc5, 4…Nd4, 4…d6, 4…g6.

Boris stays loyal to his principle to find new ideas in a less explored territory.

His attention was caught by a new and almost unexplored idea.

The starting position arises after: 4.g3 d5 5.cxd5 Nxd5 6.Bg2. In this position for decades the move 6…Nb6 was played almost automatically. This position is very popular at all levels. The theory considers this line as playable. Both sides have various plans and this position is analyzed quite deeply in different sources. That’s why Boris chose another line, which is fresh and quite ambitious – 6…Bc5.

This move was played in some amateur games, but GM Aleksander Grischuk introduced it at the very high level during the Geneva Grand Prix in July 2017.

The game finished with a nice win for the Russian grandmaster. Since that game, GMs such as Caruana, Karjakin, Wang Hao, Inakriev, and Adams tried this move.

At the end of 2017, we can say that this is the most topical like in the English opening and you can expect hundreds of new games in this line. Of course, Modern Chess will keep you updated about the newest trends in this line, but for now White failed to prove an advantage here.

GM Avrukh’s analyses are quite rich of new moves and ideas and most importantly he manages to explain all important strategical and tactical ideas.

In Chapter 7, Boris shows us that all the tricks like 7.Nxe5 or 7.0-0 0-0 8.Nxe5 are not working for White. Continue reading the full article here

Categories: Ενημέρωση

Alexandra Kosteniuk and Mariya Muzychuk advance to the Semi-final

Wed, 11/14/2018 - 19:47

The Quarterfinals of the Women’s World Championship were concluded on November 14 with two tie-breaks: Alexandra Kosteniuk defeated Anna Muzychuk, and Zhansaya Abdumalik lost to Mariya Muzychuk.

Kosteniuk played the first game with White and obtained a promising position after the opening. Then Black managed to activate her pieces and got a strong counterplay. However, being under heavy time pressure, Muzychuk made several mistakes, giving Kosteniuk a decisive advantage.

Muzychuk started the second game with 1.f4 and got an overwhelming advantage already in the opening. However, with very tenacious defense Alexandra managed to hold a difficult endgame. Looking for possible winning chances, Muzychuk avoided a number of drawing lines, and Black even got an edge. In the end Kosteniuk secured a draw from the position of strength and advanced to the Semi-final with the overall 1.5-0.5 win.

Mariya Muzychuk started the tie-break with a Black victory: Abdumalik failed to convince in the opening and then was gradually outplayed in the endgame. In the return game Abdumalik managed to create a complicated battle. Muzychuk sacrificed a piece, but her compensation proved insufficient. With some adventures in the mutual time trouble Abdumalik converted an extra piece, and the players proceeded to “10+10” stage.

The first 10-minute game was highly dramatic. Zhansaya Abdumalik was defending for the entire game and was very close to a draw. In the endgame R+N vs R she had the right to claim a draw according to the 50-move rule, despite being mated in two moves. However, instead of claiming a draw, Abdumalik resigned.

However, Zhansaya demonstrated her fighting spirit and came back in the second game. The match continued by two more blitz games with faster time control.

Mariya Muzychuk won the first 5+3 blitz as White, then got a much better position as Black and forced a draw by perpetual, thus advancing to the next stage.

 

Semi-final pairings:

 

Alexandra Kosteniuk-Ju Wenjun

Mariya Muzychuk-Kateryna Lagno

 

All players who had advanced to the Semi-final except for the future champion automatically qualified for the 2019 Women’s Candidates Tournament.

Categories: Ενημέρωση

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